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Apply & close

Does your employer offer adequate support in dealing with stress in the workplace?

I've been looking at ASD (anxiety, stress and depression) rates at different trusts and wanted to ask people to get in touch with their good or bad experiences, particularly in the run-up to the International Conference on Physician Health on September 15-17.

I am interested in how well supported you feel in terms of dealing with stress in the workplace. Does your trust or employer have a particularly robust or effective strategy for dealing with stress and guarding against work-related anxiety or even depression? Could you give examples? Or, do you feel your trust could do more - how/why? Do you think this issue is more of a problem for junior doctors? Are consultants immune to these problems?

Is this an issue that employers should take more notice of and do you think it is a prevalent problem within the medical workforce? You can post your comments below either signed in, or anonymously. 

38 replies

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Anonymous:

    Did you have access to, receive any psychiatric or mental health intervention before considering early retirement? Dr Leslie Dobson GP Health Ltd email [email protected]

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    Just to mention the Doctors' Support Network which is a fully confidential peer support organisation for doctors with mental health problems.  DSN is an adjunct to other support for sick doctors and offers a support forum as well as regional meetings and an annual conference. Website. Www.dsn.org.uk

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Anonymous:

    Am afraid this is true. Anon.

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Anonymous:

    I hear what you say and my experience of 'support' in the training programme boils down these days to 'time in training' and once they know you have a mental illness your trainers will decide that they cannot see you coping as a consultant in the NHS and so cannot sign you off with a CCT.

    So much for the caring profession!

  • In reply to Anonymous:

    Just to update you as we look more into some of the issues raised on this topic - here is a link to the news analysis I wrote about sickness absence rates related to anxiety, stress and depression (this piece also appeared in BMA News magazine in the weekend's September 13 issue).

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Tim Tonkin:

    Thank you for showing interest. After my first episode off sick,  Occ Health have advised for my timetable to be changed. Department did not even acknowledge it. With this current episode, which is related to bullying, occ health have suggested I be removed from the bully's clinics. It remains to be seen if they will actually help me. Interestingly the BMA rep whom I thought would be helping me, suggested that at mediation I should aim to  'kiss and make-up'with the bully such that I can return to work, ie square one. Apparently it is most important that I should go back to work, never mind addressing the fact that I am the victim of bullying. Go figure.

  • Anonymous
    Anonymous

    In reply to Anonymous:

    I was made redundant while I was seriously ill. Id been for a while and didnt know my employer knew I was extremely ill. They offered me a job I accepted however because I became so ill the boss pulled it he didnt give me my 4 week window offered me marity but I ended up resigning tried to retract however they decline. My me so ill no health assessment or duty of care
  • not at all. my consultant/medical director hates me a lot. he always threat me, tries to find a way to kick me off, invents smears, gimme inappropriate communication "these are the rules of the game or you can go back to your country", if i complain of somebody he is ready to punish me viceversa nurse and the other doctors are free to complain of me, if i try to have a conversation with him either he neglects me or says "you lack of insight". i feel frustrated and depressed. this morning i went to local police station to make a complain against my medical director and the officer advised me to speak with the trust manager about my concerns. however i have been working, i got unfairness and bullying. once i underwent the GMC hearing which was closed with "no consequence as there was no obvious evidence of malpractice and rudeness". i can't deal with people's smears anymore. i can't work in such an environment in which whoever can give you trouble if you don't fit with him/her. nurses are the worst ever. for god's sake, i am not telling that each nurse is evil but 2 or 3 of them are enough to make your life a nightmare and no one can defense or protect you by smears. and GMC gives its contribute to kill doctors rather than protect us as workers and human being. the hearing is awful. they don't listen to you at all. they don't want to know if you are a victim or not. unfortunately i can't change british system and i am going to change country whereby i will be able to work in peace