Role models of women in academic medicine

Take a closer look at 15 role model doctors who shared their experiences of what it is like to be a woman in academic medicine.

Location: UK
Audience: Medical academics
Updated: Friday 14 May 2021
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Celebrating women in academic medicine

Women

At the Group’s conference in 2018, WAM opened nominations for women in academic medicine who lead by example in their careers.

We have selected fifteen women who have distinguished themselves for having motivated and inspired those around them.

We hope their stories will encourage more women to pursue a career in academic medicine and help eradicate existing barriers in the profession.

 

A snippet of their inspirational stories

Lucy Chappell, NIHR research professor in Obstetrics

Dr Chappell knows too well the challenges relating to being a clinical academic and a working mother.

She has seen many women in her field succeed in their research while attending to their caring responsibilities, but she admits there is still a lot to be done around gender role stereotypes.

Helen Laycock, clinical lecturer in Pain medicine

Having had some of the best mentors inspire and shape her career in medical academics, Dr Laycock recognises the power of working in a supportive environment that encourages female doctors to explore opportunities and overcome challenges.

Now, she couldn't imagine a life where she is not doing clinical research.

Scarlett McNally, consultant orthopaedic surgeon

Dr McNally is involved in many activities to raise the profile of women in medicine and reduce gender role bias. She has never let other people's stereotypes determine how she should be treated, or question her ability to progress in her role.

To her, change lies in making the medical career more diverse...and that needs the support of men and organisations too.

Ebere Okereke, consultant in Public health

With many years of experience in international health systems, Dr Okereke is one of the few senior women working in global health in the UK of African descent.

As someone who has experienced the barriers of being a woman of colour in medicine herself, she recognises the importance of mentoring other women from the same background.

WAM roundtable

As part of our celebration of women in academic medicine, the WAM group held an online session on Wednesday 24 March.

Our co-chairs introduced the current work of WAM, including promoting role models and understanding the barriers to career progression.

Watch the webcast