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Patient information awards winners

Our final judging panel chooses the BMA Patient Resource of the Year award from a wide range of resources. Several additional special awards are also assigned to the best resources in certain specific categories. 13 special award first prizes and 13 runner up prizes were made from the rest of the highly commended awards, including the new awards for information on Equality, Diversity & Inclusion and Wellbeing.

BMA President, Professor Dinesh Bhugra CBE, presented these awards at a reception at BMA House on Tuesday 25 September 2018.

Read the BMA's press release for the awards.

Patient groups and charities who would like to enter the awards next year should contact Richard Jones in the BMA Library on [email protected]

 

The 2018 ceremony

Download the 2018 awards ceremony programme

 

  • BMA patient resource of the year

    Cervical Screening Flower CampaignCervical Screening Flower Campaign
    NHS Health Scotland and Scottish Government

    Flower was a joint campaign between NHS Health Scotland and the Scottish Government which aimed to grab the attention of young women aged 25-35 years old and start breaking down some of the barriers to attending their cervical screening appointment.

    The overall ambition of the campaign was to increase levels of uptake in cervical screening among women in lower socio-economic groups living in Scotland. As this will take several years to materialise in view of the triennial check, the following objectives were set:

    • To raise awareness of the benefits of cervical screening
    • To encourage women to attend when invited or, if they missed their last appointment or have never been screened
    • To contact their GP practice to book an appointment and to generate ‘talkability’ about cervical screening with women and their peers so that they are more informed on the topic

    Early thinking was informed by a short-life working group of multi-disciplinary stakeholders who provided advice on the campaign's key messages and call to action. The group comprised of: topic experts at NHS Health Scotland, screening policy advisors at Scottish Government, National Specialist and Screening Services at NHS National Services Scotland, screening co-ordinators in local NHS Boards, communications managers in local NHS Boards, Cancer Research UK and Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust.

    We continued to work closely with our topic expert at NHS Health Scotland and SG policy colleagues throughout the life of the project. The campaign was informed by focus group research with our target audience, who told us that they wanted to be spoken to in a conversational manner, using language and phrases they use and hear about them every day. They felt the campaign needed to evoke an emotional reaction to overcome the significant barriers about the topic area, which is reflected in the language and imagery used in the film.

    BMA president Prof Dinesh Bhugra CBE said:

    “I am delighted to present the award for our overall patient resource of the year to the Cervical Screening Flower Campaign by NHS Health Scotland and the Scottish government. It is an excellent example of how a campaign with a clear and well-articulated focus can have a significant influence.
    “This video works well in that it combines humour and warmth whilst conveying a sense of urgency regarding the necessity of cervical screening. The campaign had a much wider reach than was initially expected which is a testament to how well it was executed and easily relatable to the target audience.”

    This was reviewed by BMA Patient Information Awards director, Mr Richard Jones, who wrote:

    ‘This is a simple resource with one key message; to increase the uptake of cervical cancer screening in Scotland. The message (‘It's time to stop fannying around’) concisely conveys the urgency of the situation and the poignancy of unnecessary deaths. The voiceover artist is exceptional, and her tone conveys humour, urgency and warmth.

    The video is short and direct using the folds of a rose petals on a funeral wreath to bring home that six women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each week in Scotland. The dissemination of the video was widespread and involved social media campaigns as well as cinema advertising. I was impressed too that primary care toolkits were developed to support the anticipated uptake in screening.

    The metrics supplied demonstrate the success of the campaign: half of the testing group acted after seeing the film. The views of the video were five times over target and the return on investment was calculated at 7:1. They carried out awareness tracking to assess recognition of the campaign and its impact on awareness and behaviour. An impressive 59% of women recognised the campaign when prompted and 49% of women acted as a result of the campaign (attended their smear, called their GP, or talked to a friend, partner or family member about smear tests).’

    Find out more

  • All category winners

    Special Award - Children - First Prize

    Joe's Liver Transplant StoryJoe's Liver Transplant Story
    Children's Liver Disease Foundation (CLDF)

    Joe's Liver Transplant Story is designed to help children to understand what a liver transplant is and to learn about the processes involved. It is aimed at children who may need a transplant in the future or who are on the waiting list and children who have undergone a liver transplant in the past but were too young to understand what was happening at the time.

    It can also be used by siblings and friends of children who have had or need a liver transplant, parents, play specialists, or psychologists with children. Primarily targeted at four to eight-year-olds, it is suitable for younger and older children as a starting point for discussion. It tells Joe's story from liver transplant assessment right through to recovery after surgery, using simple language and appealing illustrations.

    The writer of the initial story was the mother of a transplant recipient who is also a palliative care consultant. She was therefore uniquely placed to provide a view of the experience from a small child’s point of view but also with clinical accuracy.

    There are three specialist centres in the UK where paediatric liver transplants take place (Kings College Hospital, London Birmingham Children’s Hospital and Leeds General Infirmary). Healthcare professionals from each were involved to ensure the processes involved within the story accurately depicted each of the centres. Their involvement in the project was invaluable to ensure that the story was accurate.

    Copies of the book have been sent to each of the three paediatric liver transplant units to be used by nursing staff and play specialists as part of the liver transplant assessment and preparation process. In this way the book can be used in context, introduced at the appropriate time and will help prepare a child for what is going to happen. The book is available on request from CLDF for parents who want to explain to a child what they went through as a baby or toddler or who want to show siblings what is happening to a younger child.

    This was reviewed by Dr Liz Goode, Wellcome trust clinical research fellow and specialty training registrar in gastroenterology, who wrote:

    ‘This is a unique resource, for which there is no other on the market. It is a vitally important resource in explaining a life-changing, massive operation to young children. It makes excellent use of language suitable to target audience with good explanation of medical team members and complicated things such as ITU stay and the wires/machine/drains that may be around.

    The story is well-written, clinically accurate with extensive medical and user feedback conducted to ensure its content is applicable and appealing to the intended audience. The illustrations turn the text into a story book for children; the depictions of staff are friendly and non-threatening. This resource deals with a sensitive topic in a way that is highly accessible to its target audience. Well done!’ 

    Find out more


    Special Award - Children - Runner Up

    Just for Kids - Epilepsy ActionJust for Kids
    Epilepsy Action 

    Just for Kids is Epilepsy Action’s range of online and print resources aimed at children aged 5-11 years old with epilepsy and their families. These include:

    • Six short animations featuring Ali, Jack and Anna;
    • A children’s pack distributed to paediatric epilepsy clinics, containing a DVD of the animations
    • Storybooks
    • An activity book
    • Colouring pencils and stickers
    • A new child-friendly section of our website, to contain all new resources and existing material for schools and families

    The aim was to provide child-friendly patient information about epilepsy, to enable children to understand different aspects of their condition and discuss it with their families and healthcare professionals. The intended outcomes of the project were: children with epilepsy have increased knowledge and understanding of their condition; feel more confident and less anxious; take part in the management of their condition; discuss their questions and concerns with parents, teachers and healthcare professionals and to realise that other children and adults have epilepsy. Distributing the packs for free provides engaging, easy to understand information in many clinics.

    This was reviewed by BMA Patient Information Awards director, Mr Richard Jones, who wrote:

    ‘I liked this suite of resources which has been developed in consultation with paediatric epilepsy nurses who have daily contact with children with epilepsy. The suite includes PDF and online picture books and animated videos. I liked the style and tone of the videos. The resource has been widely shared and promoted. The evaluation plan to use a structured telephone interview with the nurses who distribute and use the packs is better than most plans. I like the way that the feedback is geared to children. Each pack also contains a prepaid postcard, which both children and families can use to state how they have used the pack. All in all, its positive tone succeeds in its aim to educate children about not only living life to the full but safely.’

    Find out more


    Special Award - Decision-Making - First Prize

    What now? Questions to ask after a terminal diagnosisWhat now? Questions to ask after a terminal diagnosis
    Compassion in Dying

    Compassion in Dying's new booklet 'What now? Questions to ask after a terminal diagnosis' is based on the experiences of more than 600 people living with terminal illness and their carers, reflecting how people access information, who they speak to about their options, and crucially, what people wish they’d known at the time they first received their diagnosis.

    What now? aims to enable people to make the decisions about their treatment and care that are right for them. The booklet is designed for people with a terminal illness but can be used by anyone making decisions about their treatment or care, for instance people living with one or more long term health conditions.

    What now? includes information from real-life experience about how it feels to get a diagnosis, what it’s like to live with an illness, the impact this can have on family and friends, who people can talk to about their health, and practical advice about things to get organised.

    Importantly, What now? includes a list of questions that can be removed and taken to appointments, so people can decide what they want to know, how to ask, and have space to write things down. This is because the people we spoke with told us that having honest conversations with their families and healthcare teams helped them to understand what to expect, and to make the decisions that are right for them. However, they also reflected that what they wanted to know could be forgotten in the moment, perhaps because the information is hard to take in, or because the conversation goes in a different direction.

    It aims to enable people to take a more active role in their health and care decisions, equipping them with the knowledge and confidence to ask questions in line with their personal values and priorities. As set out in the Royal College of Physician’s position statement on Shared Decision Making (2013) and as highlighted by the Royal College of General Practitioner’s focus on person-centred care, there is ample evidence to demonstrate that when people are involved in decision-making, they receive care and treatment which is in line with their values and achieve better health outcomes.

    As such, it also aims to support health and care professionals working in a range of settings to understand the range of emotions their patients may be experiencing, in order that they are better able to facilitate meaningful discussion and shared decision making about treatment and care.

    This was reviewed by Dr Jane Brundish, Specialty Doctor Palliative Medicine and portfolio GP, who wrote:

    ‘This is a novel idea: peer support made into a leaflet. This is a fantastic section guide to asking the right questions; it gives patients a clear message that individuals will want different information and at different rates. They can access this ask the questions they want to ask. It makes particularly good use of question section where patients are guided in how to ask right questions. Many patients struggle to know how to ask sensible or appropriate questions when faced with a tight consultation time and under pressure. It is a perfectly sized sustainable guide to take to appointments. It normalises emotion and I am confident it will ensure patients feel less alone when facing the decisions and journey.’

    Find out more


    Special Award - Decision-Making - Runner Up

    Prostate Cancer UK logoHow to manage sex and relationships
    Prostate Cancer UK

    Prostate cancer and its treatment can affect your sex life. In May 2017, we launched five online and interactive guides designed to help men self-manage side effects and symptoms of prostate disease and treatment. Many men affected by prostate disease experience side effects, either from the disease itself or because of treatment for the disease – problems such as getting an erection, fatigue and incontinence. These can have a huge impact on their lives.

    Online self-management information can give men choice in how and when to access the care they need and be an accessible solution for those who may not feel comfortable about interacting with care services face-to-face or over the phone. The objectives of the How to manage guides are to make men know more about how to manage the possible symptoms and side effects and how to manage them as well as feeling more confident talking to their doctor or nurse about their condition.

    We used a range of ways to present information in an interactive format: slideshows, quizzes, image galleries, word clouds, trackers and diaries and animations.

    This was reviewed by Mrs Louise Coghlin, freelance writer and editor in health, wellbeing and life sciences, who wrote:

    'I think the way in which the resource was developed is exceptionally good: the approach taken throughout the development of the resource is hugely impressive. The creators twice consulted 13 health professionals with a range of specialisms from many different organisations and involved users from the earliest stages onwards. For example, they listened to users when defining what was needed, featured users who share their stories in the resource itself, and is still inviting users to contribute via feedback questions.

    The effectiveness of the resource is measured by finding out whether users change their behaviour in any way after using the resource. I think this resource is to be applauded for covering such a wide range of important topics in such a constructive, unbiased and empathetic way. It’s great to know this resource is out there.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Easy Read - First Prize

    How is myeloma treated?How is myeloma treated?
    Myeloma UK

    Myeloma is a rare and complex cancer arising from plasma cells within the bone marrow. The relative rarity of myeloma is one of the main reasons why most people have not heard of it before diagnosis; when patients are diagnosed with myeloma, clear and comprehensive information is an absolute necessity.

    We also recognise the need for a variety of formats of information so that anyone diagnosed with myeloma can access information in a way that is suitable for them, enabling them to understand what it is and to be empowered to cope with their diagnosis. This easy read publication has been produced to address the need for diversity in formats of information available for myeloma patients.

    Its purpose is to explain clearly and succinctly how myeloma is treated. It aims to follow easy read guidelines and use pictures and simple text to give readers an understanding of myeloma treatment, and to encourage them to speak to their healthcare team if they have any questions. Consequently, anyone reading this publication should feel more empowered with a greater understanding of their situation.

    It also aims to complement two other easy read publications we have produced. As a suite, these publications give a comprehensive overview of myeloma, each with a focus on one key question patients may have. The intended audience is anyone who finds reading text-heavy publications difficult and would prefer reading simpler, clearer information that utilises pictures to underpin the message of the text. This is likely to be people with learning disabilities, but it may also be useful for people who are not fluent in English; they may be myeloma patients themselves or they may know someone with myeloma.

    This was reviewed by Ms Jane E Teather, Information Design Consultant at JETDoc, who wrote:

    ‘I am impressed by this resource which takes some difficult, complex and potentially distressing messages and makes them accessible for people who would otherwise struggle to comprehend and/or accept them. I like the design, which is great for reading together with a carer, and which focuses on each message individually, so people can take it one step at a time. Text and graphics are combined in an easily accessible layout. T

    he booklet should be great for most of the audience, especially as it is in suitable format to be read together with a friend/carer or healthcare professional, leaving space to add notes or highlights if necessary. The e-book format may be preferred by some readers. Considerable effort has been put into its development. It is a high-quality resource, which forms part of a comprehensive programme of support.’

    Find out more


    Special Award - Easy Read - Runner Up

    Your baby! What you need to know about tests offeredYour baby! What you need to know about tests offered
    NHS Health Scotland 

    This booklet explains what conditions can be tested for and what the tests involve, so parents can decide whether they want their baby to have them. It is important that parents realise the reasons for screening and understand the possible outcomes if they choose not to have the tests. Early drafts of this resource were tested with volunteers with learning disabilities. They provided thorough feedback and updates were made based on this feedback. This easy read version has been specifically designed for people with learning disabilities or low literacy levels.

    This was reviewed by Dr Doris Campbell, Honorary Reader in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at the University of Aberdeen, who wrote:

    ‘This leaflet is clearly targeted appropriately and is easy to follow. It is excellent and very useful adjunct to the mainstream resource from which it is derived. All the medical terms used are very clearly explained and are appropriate for its targeted readership. Throughout the leaflet there are coloured, suitable and helpful images for each subsection which are always relevant to the section to which they refer and augment the text. It strikes a good balance about the risks of not screening and the readers’ concerns.’

    Find out more


    Special Award - Equality, Diversity and Inclusion - First Prize

    Your Treatment and Care: Planning ahead for the LGBT communityYour treatment and care: Planning ahead for the LGBT Community
    Compassion in Dying

    Compassion in Dying’s publication, ‘Your treatment and care: Planning ahead for the LGBT community’, produced in collaboration with Opening Doors London and Stonewall, is the first ever resource designed specifically for the LGBT community on end-of-life care planning.

    We learned through our work with organisations that support older LGBT people, reports from the Care Quality Commission (A different ending, May 2016) and Marie Curie (Hiding who I am, 2016), that the LGBT community can face specific and significant barriers stopping them from getting the end-of-life care they want.

    This can include healthcare professionals making assumptions about their preferences for care and a lack of understanding about what or who is important to them. This booklet sets out the different ways in which LGBT people may plan ahead. It explains that by making an advance decision, an advance statement or appointing a Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA) for Health and Welfare, individuals can set out their wishes for treatment and care and their preferences about who they would like involved in their care, in case they lose capacity to express this themselves.

    In addition to supporting individuals to plan ahead in a way that is right for them, the booklet includes case studies to highlight the diverse concerns faced by older LGBT people when thinking about their end-of-life care. Therefore, it is also aimed at supporting health and care professionals working in a range of settings to understand the varied experiences of their patients, so that they are better able to facilitate meaningful person-centred care.

    This was reviewed Ms Clare Woodford, Senior Policy Advisor (Equality, Inclusion and Culture), who said:

    'This is a really valuable resource which adds to the body of patient literature on end of life decisions/ LGBT-specific healthcare resources. Congratulations on producing this: I'm sure it will take the complexity out of a very hard to understand but important aspect of healthcare decision making.’

    Find out more


    Special Award - Equality, Diversity and Inclusion - Runner Up

    Breast cancer in younger women: coping with a diagnosis at 45 or underBreast cancer in younger women: coping with a diagnosis at 45 or under
    Breast Cancer Care 

    Breast cancer is not common in younger women and most women diagnosed with breast cancer are more than 50 years old. Nevertheless, it is the most common cancer in women under 40 years old. This group tend to have unique needs and they may not meet others during treatment or at support groups who are in the same situation.

    This programme and booklet aims to provide support and signpost specialist breast cancer care services. It has been written by Breast Cancer Care, with input from younger women who have had breast cancer. It looks at some of the common issues faced by women who are diagnosed at a younger age, such as relationships, intimacy, body image, fertility and pregnancy. By highlighting these concerns, we hope that younger women will feel less alone and can find ways to seek support.

    This was reviewed by Ms Kate Brian, Women's Voices lead, RCOG, who wrote: 

    ‘This is an excellent resource which covers a wide range of issues that might arise for a young woman with breast cancer in a sensitive way. It is written well, clearly laid out and is easy to understand without feeling patronising. The use of quotes from women with lived experience is effective. It covers the emotional response to diagnosis and to living with breast cancer particularly well.’

    Find out more


    Special Award - Ethics - First Prize

    Coping with BereavementCoping with Bereavement
    Independent Age

    This guide is designed for older people who have been bereaved; the target audience is people over 60 years of age, but much of the information is relevant to people of all ages. It aims to reassure people about what they are experiencing by exploring some of the common effects of grief and to provide people with information about support services and organisations that are available and how they can help and encourage them to use these services.

    It has been peer reviewed by a bereavement professional working for Cruse Bereavement Care (Fiona Turnbull). She reviewed the guide at a development stage and made suggestions about content and structure that were incorporated into the guide. The guide was also reviewed by our in-house technical advisor for wellbeing (Anna Goodman). A research consultancy, Kaleidoscope, conducted eight depth interviews for us with people over 60 who had been bereaved in the past two years. They provided detailed feedback on an early draft of the guide, covering topics including the tone, the length of the guide and the content it covered. Their overall first impression was that it was comprehensive, emotionally supportive, practical and informative. The interviewees also provided us with quotes about their personal experiences of bereavement, and one more in-depth case study, which we were able to use in the guide, helping to make the content more relatable to those reading it.

    This was reviewed by Dr Ian Lawrie, Consultant & Honorary Clinical Senior Lecturer in Palliative Medicine:

    ‘The tone, language, structure and content of this resource is excellent. There is sound, practical advice for people who have been bereaved in several specific circumstances, with appropriate observations and advice, as well as sign-posting, at every stage. It is brief enough to be read by someone who is grieving, but also has enough 'onward suggestions' to be exceptionally useful to them as time moves on. There is a lovely use of very brief quotes from individuals who have been bereaved which helps enhance the text of the resource.’

    Find out more


    Special Award - Ethics - Runner Up

    Marie Curie logoPalliative Care Knowledge Zone
    Marie Curie 

    Many people affected by terminal illness are cared for by health and social care professionals who are not specially trained or experienced in providing palliative care. This is particularly true of junior and unqualified health and social care staff. Introductory materials on end of life care for health and social care staff are not readily available and accessible for free in one place. We want to share our expertise and help enable professionals working in different care settings to increase their understanding and confidence of end of life care.

    The main purpose of the Palliative Care Knowledge Zone is to give health and social care professionals the information they need to provide better care for people living with a terminal illness by providing our expertise on end of life care and to signpost health and social care professionals to other reputable information and organisations.

    This was reviewed by Dr Jane Brundish, Specialty Doctor Palliative Medicine and portfolio GP, who wrote:

    ‘It is hard to put into words what an exceptional resource this is; an assimilation of holistic patient needs with life-limiting illnesses. It clarifies the distinction of palliative care and the last days of life. By nature of the clear concise overview, health care professionals can access the communication guides, legal aspects, spiritual care alongside symptom control. This subtly promotes the messages of advance care planning, total care and life limiting care for cancer and non-cancer patients.

    These aspects can be overlooked but this resource reminds and helps us to access this. I noted particularly the palliative care for homeless patients which is overlooked at times. I was particularly impressed by the ease of feedback and diverse and credible contributors. This is a resource to use in practice and as a teaching resource.‘

    Find out more


    Special Award - Innovation - First Prize

    Cervical Screening Flower CampaignCervical Screening Flower Campaign
    NHS Health Scotland and Scottish Government

    Find out more about the Cervical Screening Flower Campaign in the tab above - 'Patient resource of the year'

     

     


    Special Award - Innovation - Runner Up

    My Alcohol TrackerMy Alcohol Tracker
    Cancer Research UK

    My Alcohol Tracker is an alcohol tracking skill for Alexa-compatible devices. You can use My Alcohol Tracker to add drinks to your weekly total and set yourself a personal goal to drink no more than a certain amount (you can use the recommended guidelines of no more than 14 units a week or pick a limit of your own).

    We have also included information on the number of calories you are drinking as well as hints and tips on ways to cut down. The aim of this innovative, sector leading project is two-fold: to test whether the public would want to access health and/or cancer related information from Cancer Research UK via voice technology and to reach the public with health information on the topic of alcohol – hopefully to motivate and help them to cut down on their consumption.

    The intended target audience for the My Alcohol Tracker skill are drinkers (of any age or sex) with an Alexa-enabled device. With its ease of use, and no need to fiddle about with handheld devices, voice could also be a valuable aid for people with visual impairments or certain physical disabilities – such as limited mobility or dexterity. It could also help people access and understand information if reading lots of text isn’t for them, offering something that better suits their needs.

    This was reviewed by Mr Wayne Middleton, Chief Executive at Luto, who wrote:

    ‘The app is designed to record data and provide a summary and basic information. It’s an innovative use of technology and Alexa skills. It achieved good coverage during Alcohol Awareness Week. It would be very interesting to see the results of the evaluation. I hope you publish them to encourage other information producers to follow in your steps.’

    Find out more


    Special Award - Long-Term Conditions - First Prize

    Medicines in Rheumatoid ArthritisMedicines in Rheumatoid Arthritis
    National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society

    Our aim is to make it as easy as possible for people living with RA (rheumatoid arthritis) to know about the available medications used in their treatment, help them feel more confident about what the future holds and understand why their treatment may need to change from time to time.

    The reasons for a comprehensive publication are to provide a short summary of RA; what it is, why and how is it treated and to increase understanding that the aim of treatment is to control RA by either achieving remission or sustained low disease activity.

    It also aims to provide suitable and accessible information for all RA medicines in one booklet and to outline the possible treatment options available and any likely progressions from one treatment to another. The resource will increase understanding that any one person will quite possibly have more than one medication, either at the same time or in sequence and reassure people coping with RA that during a lifetime some treatments may not work, or work only for a limited period, and other options will be considered.

    This was reviewed by Dr Michael Denman, emeritus Consultant Clinical Immunologist, who wrote:

    ‘Patients and their relatives reading this publication will have a very varying understanding of the clinical and scientific issues. This publication is a model example of how to help all readers with explanations which will be comprehensible to all readers – perhaps sometimes with a little guidance. The booklet makes clear that its purpose is to inform and thereby help patients with rheumatoid arthritis to understand the rationale of their treatment. However much of the description is difficult because it is a complex subject and oversimplification would be pointless dumbing down and might threaten patients' confidence. Some complexity is unavoidable.

    Many readers will need further explanation and guidance, but they already know, or will now know, to whom to turn. This was a carefully conceived and orchestrated project. There were inevitably many sources of information of varying medical and scientific sophistication. Congratulations on a team effort.’

    Find out more


    Special Award - Long-Term Conditions - Runner Up

    MS Society logoExercises for MS symptoms
    MS Society

    The audience is people with MS (multiple sclerosis) who want to better manage their MS symptoms. Its objectives are to help people practice symptom-specific exercises to better manage their MS-related balance and walking problems, fatigue, bladder issues, muscle spasms/stiffness and memory and thinking problems and to signpost sources of further information.

    Five people with MS took part in the video filming, with varying ages, levels of mobility, with both types of MS (relapsing and progressive) and different times since diagnosis. From publication in late January 2018 until the end of February 2018 there have been 13,749 views of the videos.

    This was reviewed by BMA Patient Information Awards Director, Mr Richard Jones, who wrote:

    ‘I liked this suite of resources. The page looks very good with bold images of the patients who discuss each issue. The presenters have a natural warmth which is engaging and commands attention. The advice given is practical and focussed on achievable aims. Each of the five videos is presented by someone with MS: the overall style of the resource is user-focussed. The page links to further web information on each of the issues.’

    Find out more

    Special Award - Screening - First Prize

    Having a gastroscopy in hospitalHaving a gastroscopy in hospital
    Oxford Medical Illustration

    This resource aims to increase patients’ knowledge of what to expect when they are asked to attend the department for an endoscopy and to reduce patient anxiety about coming for an appointment.

    We want to improve patient experience, by better briefing patients in what to expect and want to encourage engagement of patients in the work of the department. We intend to reduce wasted appointment slots caused by patients who do not attend due to anxiety. The endoscopy lead at Buckinghamshire Health NHS trust, Dr Sue Cullen, determined the initial need for the resource and approached us to produce it. We met and discussed the production scope, purpose and aims. From this discussion we produced a brief that was then approved by the endoscopy team at Buckinghamshire Health before we arranged dates and scheduled in shoots.

    This was reviewed by Ms Katrina Glaister, trust lead for patient information at Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust, who wrote:

    ‘The involvement of users is a particular strength of this resource and the number of people who have watched the video is testament to them having got their dissemination plan right! I really like the use of video and it does help reduce any anxiety.’

    Find out more

    Special Award - Screening - Runner Up

    Cervical Screening Flower CampaignCervical Screening Flower Campaign
    NHS Health Scotland and Scottish Government

    Find out more about the Cervical Screening Flower Campaign in the tab above - 'Patient resource of the year'

     

     


    Special Award - Self-Care - First Prize

    Living with bronchiectasisLiving with bronchiectasis
    British Lung Foundation

    The audience is people affected by bronchiectasis, their families and carers. Our Respiratory Health of the Nation research highlighted that about 210,000 people in the UK were living with diagnosed bronchiectasis in 2012. This was at least four times higher than the estimate commonly used by the NHS.

    The aim of this booklet is to provide reliable information about bronchiectasis, so that people affected have the knowledge to self-manage their condition and know where they can get support. It draws on research by one of our reviewers who investigated what information people living with bronchiectasis wanted. It is written to give practical advice – answering questions such as what treatments work – and giving tips and quotes from other people living with bronchiectasis. More than half of the booklet sets out what people can do to manage their condition. It talks about maintenance treatments – such as using antibiotics and clearing sputum – and treatment for chest infections or flare-ups. There’s clear information about what people can do themselves and specifically about coping with a flare-up of their symptoms.

    This was reviewed by Mrs Jenny Lang, head librarian at Salisbury NHS Foundation Trust, who wrote:

    ‘This is an excellent resource, underpinned by thorough research into the need for the resource and the required content. The evidence-base is excellent, as is the input from healthcare professionals and patients. I was very impressed with the involvement of users, beginning with ascertaining the prevalence of the disease and the need for the further development of what was a leaflet into a booklet; followed by finding out through various channels what information users wanted in such a booklet.

    The resource is widely and effectively disseminated and has received much positive feedback. The resource is clearly set out and the content excellent, clear and easy to read. The examples from people suffering from this condition enhance the content.’

    Find out more

    Special Award - Self-Care - Runner Up

    How to Sleep Safely During PregnancyHow to Sleep Safely During Pregnancy
    Tommy’s

    This resource aims to raise awareness of new research that definitively links going to sleep supine with stillbirth. We knew the research would be presented in the media as a scaremongering story, so our first objective was to produce a friendly non-threatening film that would give the information but not create anxiety or stress among women. Women’s involvement was crucial in doing this, so we involved users throughout the development of the film and other resources. They played a key part in helping us choose which creative route to go with. We also conducted three face-to-face individual depth interviews with women who had suffered a stillbirth. As the film went through development we consulted a panel of different women, in the third trimester of pregnancy.

    This was reviewed by BMA Patient Information Awards director, Mr Richard Jones, who wrote:

    ‘This is a fantastic resource. The animation itself is clear and simple but very carefully presented to incorporate user feedback and so ensure that the message is delivered optimally. There was a 21% increase in awareness after the campaign that pregnant women should not go to sleep on their back. The penetration of the campaign among the TV media and news media was also impressive. The considered involvement of health professionals and other experts, together with the recruitment of expectant women to give specific feedback, and the co-ordination of the publication and media campaign mark this as an exceptional campaign. The adept use of digital media and celebrity blogging mums also had a significant impact on the penetration of the campaign.‘

    Find out more


    Special Award - Trusts - First Prize

    Anaesthetic Procedure for Elective Caesarean Section (C Section)Anaesthetic Procedure for Elective Caesarean Section (C Section)
    Oxford Medical Illustration

    Women who are having a planned caesarean section will have had the process explained to them by an anaesthetist in the assessment clinic. This video will help them visualise what will happen and to consolidate the information they’ve been given. Women who are not planning to have a caesarean section but want to know what it might be like to have one should it become necessary may have any anxieties or worries addressed with the information in this video. Familiarity with this information will help with the consenting process in the emergency setting.

    This resource aims to show the location and process of anaesthesia and caesarean section and to discuss the different types of anaesthetic used and their risks and benefits. It also considers what it feels like to have a caesarean under a regional anaesthetic.

    Julia Bowditch, anaesthetist within the OUH NHS Maternity service, approached Oxford Medical Illustration to develop the production concept and brief: ‘About a quarter of births in the UK are by caesarean section. These are split into two main subtypes; elective (planned) caesarean sections and emergency (unplanned) caesarean sections. An operating theatre is a very foreign place to most patients and their partners and can be incredibly daunting places particularly if they were not expecting to have a caesarean. Many patients would like to know more about what to expect if or when they have a caesarean. A video would help them visualize what is going to or may happen to them and would help to relieve any anxieties that they have.’

    It was important that the resource could be used as a part of the informed consenting process. We worked with a patient volunteer and the patient’s testimony became central to the creation and success of the production.

    This was reviewed by BMA Patient Information Awards director, Mr Richard Jones, who wrote:

    ‘This is an excellent video which outlines the local services for caesarean section in Oxford. It was created by a local anaesthetist, but the patient contributions are reassuring and work well. It is nearly ten minutes long, but not tedious, providing clinical information and emotional reassurance. It is integrated into the maternity services and links to other leaflets. Evidence demonstrates that it is well received and distributed virally. YouTube analytics demonstrates that the resource maintains the viewers' attention. The production standards are good. I liked it.’

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    Special Award - Trusts - Runner Up

    A patient’s guide to relaxation and breathing techniquesA patient’s guide to relaxation and breathing techniques
    Lynda Jackson Macmillan Centre 

    The purpose of this leaflet is to provide information and support for patients to help them manage stress and anxiety that may arise whilst they are attending cancer treatment. The LJMC Information Team produces a range of literature that is specially written to be relevant and appropriate for patients under the care of an oncologist at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre.

    As part of the 12-point plan process, this publication has been reviewed by patients and users who are members of the Patient and User Volunteer Information Panel. They have contributed to the evolution of this resource, including both its format and content during its recent revision to ensure it meets the users’ needs and continues to comply with the Information Standard. This publication is produced specifically for patients who are undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy treatment and radiotherapy as part of their cancer management at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre. This leaflet forms part of the information prescription whilst they are attending for treatment.

    This was reviewed by Dr Kirstin May, Associate Specialist in Anaesthesia, who wrote:

    ‘This is a simple easy to use leaflet. There is evidence that feedback is incorporated into the revisions. It is produced specifically for patients who are undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy treatment at this centre so it is handed to them in person. It is distributed to 100% of its target audience.’

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    Special Award - User Engagement - First Prize

    The Children's Trust logoFrom Me to You
    The Children's Trust

    Often children and their families who stay at The Children's Trust for neurorehabilitation have been through a traumatic and life-changing experience. They’ve spent a long period in hospital and life can be very frightening. From Me to You is a short film for families coming to the Children's Trust for neurorehabilitation. It provides an honest account of what to expect when you move to The Children's Trust from families that have been through a similar experience themselves.

    The film was very generously funded by a family whose son received neurorehabilitation, and who wanted to share their experience in the hope that it would offer guidance and reassurance to other families who were about to embark on the same journey. Three families were involved in the making of the film, and their interviews are unscripted – they’re talking openly and honestly about their experiences.

    Children and young people also helped shape the film by taking part in a creative workshop, with the production company deep:black and a play specialist, where they were asked to talk about how they felt about coming to The Children's Trust and therapy sessions. This helped inform the questions families were asked. Ethan, who appears in the film, takes viewers on a wheelchair view tour of the facilities which was filmed with a GoPro. Everyone had great fun doing this.

    This was reviewed by Dr Raj Verma, Consultant Paediatrician/Associate Medical Director at Cumbria Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, who wrote:

    ‘It touches one's heart when watching the video of children and their carers or parents sharing their experiences. It gives the message very clearly of service provision in Children Trust and the standard of care provided there. Hearing from service users and parents/carers makes it more powerful.’

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    Special Award - User Engagement - Runner Up

    My Care, My FutureMy Care, My Future
    Target Ovarian Cancer

    Target Ovarian Cancer’s 'My Care, My Future' guide aims to inform and support women with incurable ovarian cancer through thinking and talking about their diagnosis and the future. It provides clear, realistic and unbiased information about palliative, hospice and end of life care. It includes sources of support about the emotional and psychological impact of a diagnosis of incurable ovarian cancer and sources of support about the practical and physical impact of incurable ovarian cancer. It will help women get the most from every day while living with incurable ovarian cancer and provide comfort and reassurance that they are not alone in their diagnosis.

    The guide contains information about what incurable ovarian means; dealing with the emotional impact of the diagnosis; sharing the news with others and the impact of incurable ovarian cancer on relationships with loved ones; living with incurable ovarian cancer; looking after your wellbeing and managing your symptoms and thinking about the future including advance care planning. The intended audience is all women with incurable ovarian cancer and family and friends of women with incurable ovarian cancer.

    This was reviewed by Powys GP, Dr Nansi-Wynne Evans, who wrote:

    ‘This is one of the best booklets on a medical topic I have ever read, particularly as it is for a group of patients who may not have the information they need. It is realistic but reassuring, and acknowledges that they have a life to live, with advice on how to live with the diagnosis of incurable ovarian cancer. This is extremely well done with truth and a genuine sharing of experience and information. Some women are photographed in their homes and this works very well.

    The resource is for women who have been diagnosed with incurable ovarian cancer, but not yet at the end of life stage. This group is most women diagnosed with the disease, and I am not aware of any other information specifically for this group. I think it fills a gap in the market, is well-resourced and well-produced. I would recommend it to our local clinicians.’

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    Special Award - Well-Being - First Prize

    My Alcohol TrackerMy Alcohol Tracker
    Cancer Research UK

    Read more about My Alcohol Tracker above

     

     


    Special Award - Well-Being - Runner Up

    Social Anxiety – a NHS self help guideSocial Anxiety – a NHS self help guide
    Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

    Social anxiety is one of the most common anxiety disorders; as many as 12% of anxiety disorders are social anxiety. Social anxiety disorder is common in men and women but tends to be higher in women. It’s a common problem that usually starts during the teenage years.

    This resource has been produced for anyone affected by social anxiety, their relatives and carers and for health professionals to signpost those who are seeking support with their social anxiety. The aim of the guide is to provide accessible, useful and reliable information where the user is helpfully guided through identifying and exploring their thoughts and feelings. The resource also offers practical advice and tools enabling the reader to work through their emotions as well as information on where to go if they need further help. As well as written information it is also available in a range of formats including Easy Read, BSL and audio.

    This was reviewed by Staffordshire GP, Dr Laura SE Barraclough, who wrote:

    ‘This is a lovely resource – portable, discreet and written in a non-judgemental style. It is full of useful further resources and sources of information. I would strongly recommend it.’

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    Special Award - Young Adults - First Prize

    Transition: your journey from paediatric into adult servicesTransition: your journey from paediatric into adult services
    British Heart Foundation

    This is a film to help provide information and support to teenage heart patients who are transitioning from paediatric into adult services. All teenage heart patients must go through this process, and this is an extremely anxious and challenging time for them. We believe we have produced a fantastic film in collaboration with young people and cardiac professionals.

    This film provides accurate, reliable information delivered by young people with heart conditions and cardiac professionals. The film includes the real-life experiences of other young people with heart conditions in an engaging, sensitive but frank way and young people can identify with those giving them advice. The film covers important topics young people want and need to know about during transition, gives them practical advice and signposts to further support.

    Young people can refer to it at home to remind themselves of advice they received during appointments and can watch it with family, friends or partners who didn’t accompany them during an appointment. Our primary audience is all young heart patients in the UK, aged 13–19 years old who will transition from paediatric to adult cardiac care. Our secondary audience is the parents of these young people. The resource is also for healthcare professionals working with young heart patients, to give them a trustworthy source of information to show their patients in clinic/refer them to.

    By giving young heart patients the information that they want and need we hope to empower them to take control of their condition and make informed decisions about their life. This resource will help them gain the confidence and knowledge they need by breaking down key information into digestible content that’s relevant to them. This information is hugely impactful because it’s being delivered to them by their peers.

    This film includes animations and interviews covering the most important topics about transition, as identified by young heart patients and healthcare professionals. It encourages young heart patients to ask questions without embarrassment and focus on facts, tips and information in an engaging way by drawing on young people’s experiences with transitional care. It also signposts them to the BHF for further support and information.

    Young people today are bombarded with information and even more so for those living with a heart condition. It can be challenging for young people to know which information is accurate and reliable. Moreover, written information can seem daunting or overwhelming, especially for those with additional learning needs such as dyslexia, learning disabilities or those for whom English isn’t their first language. As the nation’s heart charity, we want to ensure that all young people have access to the information they need to enable them to make informed decisions and take control of their health.

    Research has shown us that adult patients are not able to retain all the information given to them during appointments and for young people who are just beginning to take on more responsibility for their health it must be particularly stressful and challenging. Young people may also feel uncomfortable discussing topics with their healthcare team or not realise that other aspects of their life can impact upon their heart condition. Young people need information which they can refer to at home and which encourages them to discuss sensitive topics and wider health issues with their cardiac specialist team. Cardiac professionals need a way to provide consistent, reliable, engaging information to young people and to reach as wide an audience as possible.

    This was reviewed by Mrs Nicole Naylor, Head of Operations at the Patient Information Forum, who wrote:

    ‘This resource is absolutely fantastic. The transition for children or adolescents into adult care can be a daunting time and is sometimes a neglected area of healthcare. This resource provides much-needed reassurance in the voice of the user, on a range of topics which may not usually be discussed. Research has been carefully undertaken to find out what matters to adolescents as they transition to adult care and what issues and anxiety they may have. The resource is brimming full of reassurance and support to address these potential concerns and worries.

    The other brilliant thing that this resource does is highlight that some of the issues covered would be relevant for the average adolescent, not just an adolescent with a heart condition, so this also helps normalise the issues raised. The real-life experiences demonstrate a young person's worries and concerns but provides a really positive take on these to provide reassurance. The format used for the resource is perfect for the target audience. I highly recommend this resource.’

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    Special Award - Young Adults - Runner Up

    Me and my BrainMe and my Brain
    The Children's Trust

    Me and my Brain was created by The Children’s Trust as a way of helping teenagers and young people manage the many, often hidden, effects of mild to moderate ABI (acquired brain injury). It is estimated that more than 40,000 children in the UK are left with an ABI after an illness or accident. Many make a good recovery, but ABI can result in long-term difficulties and only a small percentage of these children are provided with support. The difficulties can be subtle and sometimes do not surface until many years later – often when a child transitions into their teenage years. This can result in young people not getting the help and support they need.

    The overarching opinion from the teenagers we spoke to was that they felt it was their parents who were given any information about their condition from health professionals and that on most occasions their own questions were overlooked. However, they wanted to have a better understanding of ABI themselves and hence feel empowered in implementing tangible rehabilitation techniques and management strategies.

    The primary aim of Me and my Brain is to further educate teenagers on their ABI. It uses plain non-condescending language and includes evidence-based information, as well as tips and advice from experts in this type of brain injury. The real-life stories interspersed throughout Me and my Brain are a vital aspect of the book, providing an element of empathy for our readers and allowing for them to draw on the experience of their peers. The book is written in a way that it will also help teachers understand the difficulties associated with the condition.

    This was reviewed by BMA Patient Information Awards director, Mr Richard Jones, who wrote:

    ‘This is an exceptional resource. The Children’s Trust follows the IS (Information Standard) and the user Programme and Award Winners 25 panel of young people resonates throughout the resource in terms of content and in the pictures. The resource includes pictures of the contributors and a group photo on the cover, so their presence is certainly visible. The advice given is practical, sensible and non-judgmental. The section on alcohol drinking is very well done: it makes the point consistently that alcohol will damage the brain further but acknowledges that some young people will want to drink in moderation.’

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    BMA Patient Information Reviewer of Year Award

    Louise Coghlin

    Louise Coghlin is a freelance writer and editor specialising in life sciences, health and illness. She has a degree in biochemistry and over 20 years’ experience working for publishers, charities, drugs companies and communications agencies.  

    She has been a reviewer for the BMA Patient Information Awards for the last five years and this year reviewed two of the winning entries: How to manage sex and relationships and Breathlessness.

    She is a member of the Advisory Group of the Patient Information Forum which was established to ensure that the interests of health information professionals, from a range of sectors, and other groups with an interest in patient information, are fully taken into account within the work of the Patient Information Forum.

    She has written: 'The need for clear, relevant, empathetic, reliable, high-quality information about health and illness, that is easy to access, can only increase as we are invited to take a greater part in decision making about our own care. I am committed to trying my best to help and working with the other members of PIF, both locally and nationally, is a great way to go about doing that.

     

    Our judging panel has also shortlisted numerous additional resources for their excellence and value.

  • Highly commended resources and commended resources

    Highly commended resources

    Title Internet resources

    5 things to know about the PrEP IMPACT Trial (WEB)
    PrEPster

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    A guide for young people looking after someone with cancer
    Macmillan Cancer Support

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    A patient’s guide to relaxation and breathing techniques
    Lynda Jackson Macmillan Centre

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    All About Leukaemia: An Easy Read Document
    Leukaemia Care

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    Anaesthetic procedure for elective caesarean section (C section) (VIDEO)
    Oxford Medical Illustration

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    Bowel cancer screening – a guide to the NHS bowel cancer screening programme in England
    Bowel Cancer UK and Beating Bowel Cancer

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    Brain Tumours and Epilepsy
    Brain Tumour Action in association with SANON

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    Breast cancer and hair loss
    Breast Cancer Care

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    Breast cancer in younger women: coping with a diagnosis at 45 or under
    Breast Cancer Care

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    Breathing and lung function tests (WEB)
    British Lung Foundation

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    Breathlessness
    British Lung Foundation

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    Brook Learn (WEB)
    Brook Charity

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    Cancer and Fertility – resource for 16 to 24-year-old cancer patients
    CLIC Sargent

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    Chloe Gets Cochlear Implants
    National Deaf Children's Society

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    Clinical trials in lymphoma (VIDEO)
    Lymphoma Action

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    Coping with bereavement
    Independent Age

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    Dealing with depression
    Independent Age

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    Diabetes UK Learning Zone (WEB)
    Diabetes UK

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    Easy read booklets: Information for people living with an illness they’ll probably die from, and their friends and family
    Marie Curie

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    Eating and drinking with motor neurone disease (OTHER)
    Motor Neurone Disease Association

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    Eating Disorders – a self help guide
    Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

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    Encephalitis in Children. A Guide
    Encephalitis Society

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    Exercises for MS symptoms (VIDEO)
    MS Society

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    Family history, genes and breast cancer
    Breast Cancer Care

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    From Me to You (VIDEO)
    [The Children's Trust

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    Give HIV The Finger (OTHER)
    Terrence Higgins Trust

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    Glue Ear: A guide for parents
    National Deaf Children's Society

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    Having a gastroscopy in hospital
    Oxford Medical Illustration

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    Having a Gastrostomy Feeding Tube
    Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

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    Hearing Voices and disturbing beliefs – an NHS self help guide
    Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

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    Heart Matters online (WEB)
    British Heart Foundation

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    Heart transplantation. A guide for families
    Little Hearts Matter

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    Hetty's Hospital (OTHER)
    Global Initiative

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    How is myeloma treated?
    Myeloma UK

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    How to manage sex and relationships (WEB)
    Prostate Cancer UK

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    How to reduce your risk of a stroke
    Stroke Association

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    How to Sleep Safely During Pregnancy (VIDEO)
    Tommy's

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    How will myeloma affect me?
    Myeloma UK

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    Joe's Liver Transplant Story
    Children's Liver Disease Foundation

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    Just for kids (WEB)
    Epilepsy Action

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    Life after transplant: An Essential Guide to GvHD
    Anthony Nolan

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    Living with ADPKD: Diet and Lifestyle (WEB)
    PKD Charity

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    Living with bronchiectasis
    British Lung Foundation

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    Me and my Brain
    The Children's Trust

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    Medicines in Rheumatoid Arthritis
    National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society

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    Moving more with MS booklet with DVD (VIDEO)
    MS Society

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    My Alcohol Tracker (OTHER)
    Cancer Research UK

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    My care, my future
    Target Ovarian Cancer

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    My child has finished treatment
    Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

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    My Decisions (WEB)
    Compassion in Dying

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    My lung surgery
    Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

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    National Lung Cancer Audit 2016 Key findings for patients and carers
    Royal College of Physicians

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    Next steps after a stroke
    Stroke Association

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    Nystagmus Information Pack (VIDEO)
    University of Sheffield

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    Palliative Care Knowledge Zone (WEB)
    Marie Curie

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    Planning for recovery: leaving hospital after a mental health crisis
    Mind, the mental health charity

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    Portion guide – helping you keep your diet balanced (WEB)
    British Heart Foundation

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    Recipes for people affected by cancer
    Macmillan Cancer Support

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    Returning to School After Encephalitis. Guidance for School Staff
    Encephalitis Society

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    Sex and sexuality after brain injury
    Headway - the brain injury association

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    Social anxiety – a self help guide
    Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

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    Supporting someone with MS – a guide for family and carers
    MS Society

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    Target Ovarian Cancer symptoms awareness campaign (OTHER)
    Target Ovarian Cancer

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    The Brain Tumour Charity: Education resources (WEB)
    The Brain Tumour Charity

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    Thyroid Cancer: For Patients, By Patients (third revised edition)
    British Thyroid Foundation

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    Transition: Moving to Adult Care
    Crohn’s and Colitis UK

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    Transition: your journey from paediatric into adult services (VIDEO)
    British Heart Foundation

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    Understanding brain metastases and lung cancer
    Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

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    Understanding your pathology results
    Breast Cancer Care

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    Understanding your small cell lung cancer
    Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

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    What now? Questions to ask after a terminal diagnosis
    Compassion in Dying

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    When you have a stroke
    Stroke Association

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    When your child's cancer comes back or does not respond to initial treatment
    Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group

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    Your baby! Tests offered: what you need to know
    NHS Health Scotland

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    Your IOPD Information Pack: Support for families with children with Infantile Onset Pompe Disease
    Sanofi Genzyme

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    Your treatment and care: Planning ahead for the LGBT Community
    Compassion in Dying

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    Commended resources

    Title Internet resources

    A quick guide to dementia
    Alzheimer's Research UK

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    ART in pictures: HIV treatment explained
    HIV i-Base

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    Atrial Fibrillation and You
    Atrial Fibrillation Association

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    Brain injury: a guide for friends
    Headway - the brain injury association

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    Caring for someone with dementia
    Age UK

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    Community breastfeeding services
    The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust

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    Cranial surgery for pituitary tumours
    Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Dept Neurosurgery

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    Crohns and Colitis: Young Person Films (VIDEO)
    Crohn’s and Colitis UK

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    Eat Well During Cancer – Helping you to cope with common side-effects of cancer and cancer treatment
    World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF UK)

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    Endoscopic surgery for pituitary tumour
    Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Dept Neurosurgery

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    Exercise and Parkinson's (WEB)
    Parkinson's UK

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    Having a Video Swallow (Videofluoroscopy)
    Betsi Cadwaladr UHB, North Wales, Dysphagia Team, Health Liaison Team for Adults with Learning Disabilities

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    Little Ted goes to school (OTHER)
    Teddington Trust

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    Maintaining your physical wellbeing: support for bereaved parents
    Child Bereavement UK

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    Mental Health & Money Advice (WEB)
    Mental Health UK

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    My Baby has a Hearing Loss: Support for parents of children aged 0–2
    National Deaf Children's Society

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    Nacoa website (WEB)
    The National Association for Children of Alcoholics

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    Pancreatic Cysts and Cystic Tumours
    Pancreatic Cancer Action

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    Personal Health Budgets, What are they and how do they work?
    Steps Charity

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    Prepwell Video (VIDEO)
    South Tees Foundation Trust in association with the School of Computing at Teeside University and ELM Alliance.

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    Self Harm – a self help guide
    Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

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    Societi Family Resource Portal (WEB)
    Societi Foundation

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    The Dementia Hub (WEB)
    Bupa

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    The facts about HPV (VIDEO)
    Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

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    The little book about Kidneys
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

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    Trio ‘Ostomy Tips’ Booklets
    Trio Healthcare Ltd

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    Understanding depression (VIDEO)
    The Loss Foundation

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    Understanding Eating Problems (WEB)
    Mind, the mental health charity

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    Understanding premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) (WEB)
    Mind, the mental health charity

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    Watch and wait (OTHER)
    Bloodwise

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    Your blood pressure and dialysis
    Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

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