Last updated:

Patient information awards winners

Our final judging panel chooses the BMA Patient Resource of the Year award from a wide range of resources. Several additional special awards are also assigned to the best resources in certain specific categories. 11 special award first prizes and 11 runner up prizes were made from the rest of the highly commended awards, including a new award for information aimed at young adults.

Professor Sir John Temple, BMA president, presented these awards at a reception at BMA House on Monday 18 September 2017.

Patient groups and charities who would like to enter the Awards next year should contact Richard Jones in the BMA Library on [email protected]

Download the 2017 awards ceremony programme

View a 'Storify' of the 2017 BMA Patient Information Awards, put together by the BMA's Social Media Team.

  • BMA patient resource of the year

    BMA Patient Information Resource of the Year 2018 - It Starts with Me by the Terrence Higgins TrustIt Starts with Me
    Terrence Higgins Trust

    It Starts With Me is a seminal ‘supercampaign’ aiming to cut new HIV infections though promoting: condom use; increased testing; and starting treatment. The campaign provides HIV prevention and testing messages – focusing on testing, treatment and condoms, in ‘blasts’ which change each quarter. It features members of the target groups as faces of the campaign to mobilise others to take action. The more people who test for HIV, the more people will be diagnosed who didn’t know about their status. This means they can get onto treatment to: keep well and live a normal lifespan and also become uninfectious – people who are on treatment with an undetectable viral load cannot pass on HIV. Recent research (the START study) has found that people who start treatment before their CD4 count drops below 350 have a significantly lower risk of illness and death. To reflect this the British HIV Association guidelines have been updated to recommend everyone with HIV starts treatment regardless of their CD4 count. In addition the PARTNER study has found that people who are on treatment with an undetectable viral load cannot pass on HIV. These two pivotal studies have changed the landscape of HIV prevention with treatment becoming a leading element of protected sex alongside condom use. We want people to know the facts about how treatment helps stop the spread of HIV and also the different ways to test – including home testing and postal testing. The campaign features a range of resources – from advertising, booklets, posters, wallet cards and an interactive website to National HIV Testing Week. This takes place each November and raises awareness of the importance of HIV testing and increases opportunities to test in different settings. The campaign has also been broadened out to include Afro Caribbeans and people from Eastern European countries as we recognise that these communities are also affected disproportionately by HIV. Our resources are available in Swahili, Polish, French, Portuguese and Somali so that we can reach even more people. The campaign first began in 2011 and due to its success has been re-commissioned by Public Health England. Terrence Higgins Trust run the campaign but work in collaboration with other HIV organisations.

    It was reviewed by the chair of the BMA patient liaison group, Ms Amanda Cool, who wrote:

    ‘It Starts with Me is a super-campaign which was developed with the collaboration of many agencies.  It uses a commendably broad range of formats including print, social media, posters and billboards and an online campaign to deliver a simple, consistent message: HIV prevention ‘starts with me’. The graphics, images and personal video stories all support the importance of taking control of HIV prevention.  Not so long ago, the subject of sexually transmitted diseases and, in particular HIV, was taboo. To approach this in a very open way, to help people learn more about prevention as well as what to do about a positive test result, is quite remarkable.

    Find out more

  • All category winners

    Special Award - Children - Winner

    Tinnitus Activity Handbook - British Tinnitus AssociationTinnitus activity book (Key stages 3-4)
    British Tinnitus Association

    The leaflets will provide a reliable source of information and support for children affected by tinnitus providing them with the tools they need to better understand and manage their tinnitus, targeted in a way they understand and find interesting. The exercises are designed to guide the child into developing a management strategy and appropriate techniques to manage their tinnitus and to reduce the distress and intrusiveness it can cause.

    It was reviewed by  the director of the BMA patient Information Awards, Richard Jones,  who wrote:

    This is a well-produced resource which is specifically targeted at young people. The consultation process with healthcare professionals and young children is thorough and demonstrated by the appropriateness of the content. It is an activity book which encourages children to think about their treatment. I think it is successful in meeting its objectives.

    Find out more

    Special Award - Children - Runner Up

    Dementia Explained - Alzheimer's Research UKDementia Explained
    Alzheimer’s Research UK

    850,000 people in the UK have dementia and an estimated 2.3 million under 18s know someone with dementia. Dementia Explained is a website for children and teenagers who want to find out more about dementia, particularly children who have a relative or someone else in their lives with the condition. We wanted a resource that would help children to make sense of some of the changes that their relative/friend is going through and explain that these changes are the result of diseases that affect the brain. We asked children about the things that they would like to know about dementia and set out to answer the questions they had about the condition. By producing a range of resources including stories, videos, games and information pages, and providing an area in which they can share their own experiences, the site is designed to be as engaging as possible for children of different ages. Alzheimer’s Research UK polling indicates that less than three in 10 parents would feel very confident explaining dementia to their children. Dementia Explained is also a resource for parents to use to help them explain to their children how dementia affects people  

    It was reviewed by coach/mentor and immediate past chair of BMA patient liaison group, Ms Catherine Macadam, who wrote:

    I think this is an exceptional resource because it fulfils a much-needed function – to explain dementia to young people – and the way it does it is beautiful to look at, a joy to use, very well-designed and easy to navigate. A huge amount of thought has gone into the creation of the resource by understanding the needs of the target audience and involving them in the creation and development of the resource, as well as providing interactive functions which allow users to contribute to it on a continuing basis. I particularly applaud the thought that has gone into providing information for the three different age categories and providing different ways of accessing the information. As someone who has been in the position of trying to help young children understand dementia in their grandparent I would have loved to have had this resource to use with them. I think the added value of this is that it not only explains, but encourages young people to be active about interacting with people with dementia and encourages a much greater openness about this topic which can be very difficult and confusing to talk about. Not only is the end product fantastic but the process of creating and designing it has been brilliant too.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Decision-Making - Winner

    Thinking of Starting a Family? - Cystic Fibrosis TrustThinking of starting a family?
    Cystic Fibrosis Trust

    This guide aims to empower people with CF (cystic fibrosis) and their partners to make informed family planning decisions. Advances in life expectancy and developments in assisted reproductive technologies have resulted in many people with CF having, or planning to have, families. The provision of information hasn’t kept pace and we were aware through our helpline and social media channels that the CF community wanted non-judgemental, clinical and experiential information on this topic. Our aim in developing this booklet was to fill this significant information gap.

    It was reviewed by former BMA librarian, Miss Jacky Berry, who wrote:

    'This is an excellent resource which gives many viewpoints from CF sufferers and partners who have made a life-changing decision to have a child. It is clear and easy to understand. I like the pictures of real people as well as the cartoons.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Decision-Making - Runner Up

    myTube – a patient information website to inform the decision to have a gastrostomy placed for people living with Motor Neurone Disease
    University of Sheffield in collaboration with staff from Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Optical Jukebox

    The myTube project had two key objectives. First, to offer a web-based education resource on gastrostomy tube feeding for people living with MND (motor neurone disease). Secondly, we wanted to further explore and develop our model of user-centred design and user-led research implementation. This involves taking current research and asking patients and carers to translate this back into user-friendly educational materials. The co-design process led to an educational resource rich in user-friendly information, offered in bite-sized sections, within an easy to navigate website structure. Videos are the chief mode of information delivery, enabling users to hear from other people living with MND using gastrostomy feeding tubes and view how they have adapted home enteral feeding into their day-to-day lives. The myTube website offers a new approach to patient education and decision support, melding best clinical practice and key research findings with the experiences of patients and carers, expressed through a range of engaging short documentary style films. Making the decision to have a gastrostomy feeding tube placed is a complex and emotive choice for patients to make. Recently the large scale, multi-centre research project, ProGas, specifically addressed the timing of gastrostomy feeding tube placement. The project team wished to build on the learnings of developing myNIV, a web-based information resource providing information to patients and carers about non-invasive ventilation (NIV) (www.niv.mymnd.org.uk). The strong ethos of user involvement had benefited the final output, and it was felt that this model could again be utilised and advanced for this clinical topic. Therefore, the same filmmakers and web-design experts who were involved in myNIV, were engaged again. They worked with patients, carers and healthcare professionals to develop a website to inform the decision to have a gastrostomy feeding tube placed. The current evidence base on gastrostomy use in MND was used as the foundation for the project, in particular the study recently published by the Sheffield MND Care and Research Centre which showed the benefits of early gastrostomy placement and conversely the harm from delayed gastrostomy. The principal investigator for this study, commissioned the development of myTube, with an aim to implement the research findings into practice. The aim was to enable the patient and carer working group to reinterpret the academic research outputs in light of their own lived experiences, and as a group translate these insights into an educational resource. myTube was intended to act as a resource to help inform and expedite discussions when patients were considering the placement of a gastrostomy feeding tube. It was not intended to replace decision support from an expert MND multidisciplinary team, rather supplement it and drive discussion of some of the key issues. By placing the voice of the patient and carer at the heart of the information offered, we aim to maximise engagement with the audience, allowing for an insight into life on home enteral feeding, backed up by input from clinicians. It aims to empower people living with MND and those with experience of caring for people living with MND to translate the research findings regarding gastrostomy feeding tube use into a user designed information resource to support individuals and to make decisions about whether or not to have a gastrostomy as well as to plan living with a gastrostomy and troubleshoot problems.

    It was reviewed by the director of the BMA patient Information Awards, Richard Jones, who wrote:

    I was very impressed by this resource. I admired its ambition and clearly stated objective to use patient stories to encourage change. The involvement of patients and their carers has been exemplary. Patients and carers were involved throughout the process: all key choices on the content and design of the recourse were user-led, with the design and clinical teams enabling this. It can also be seen in the videos which are centred on the patient experience. It is a visual adjunct to the academic study. One of the film makers, Cathy Soreny, is a registered nurse who talks about her passion to use the visual expression of patient stories to effect behaviour change. The website is very well-organised and the videos I looked at are well-produced but also compelling viewing: you can see the care that has gone into them. The Our Stories section includes introductory videos about the participants which are shot with great attention to detail and which use images to show the personalities of the participants (Trevor’s love of fishing for example). The video format is a perfect medium for instructional information but the videos which focus on difficult decisions are very moving as well.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Easy Read - Winner

    How to Make a Thickened Drink? - Sheffield Teaching HospitalsHow to Make a Thickened Drink
    Sheffield Teaching Hospitals

    This project took place in a large NHS teaching hospital. The aim was to provide accessible information leaflets for people with aphasia who have swallowing difficulties (dysphagia). Aphasia is caused by damage to parts of the brain responsible for understanding and using language. We were aware that our existing patient information was not easily accessible to patients with aphasia and that this group of individuals needed information in a more understandable format to explain how to thicken drinks to the consistency recommended by a speech and language therapist. The team wanted to create information in a format, which would support people with aphasia to be involved in decisions about their hospital treatment and their care after discharge from hospital. The resource is designed to be used as part of a supported conversation between a person with aphasia and a speech and language therapist. We developed three leaflets for each of the different drinking consistencies, which a speech and language therapist may recommend after assessing a person. These are based on the national descriptors for thickened fluids: Stage 1, Stage 2 and Stage 3.

    It was reviewed by the chair of the BMA Patient Liaison Group, Ms Amanda Cool, who wrote:

    It is absolutely clear that a lot of time and effort has gone into the production. There is clear evidence that the resource has been pulled together from a wide team of experts, and has included patients in the feedback process before going to print. It uses very clear, simple language and has the added benefit of pictures to explain the information. It is a really well-thought out and well-presented resource.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Easy Read - Runner Up

    Self Help for Tinnitus (Easy Read)
    British Tinnitus Association 

    There is no cure for tinnitus, but understanding and management tools can lead to relief from symptoms enabling people with tinnitus to lead a good quality of life. The intended audience for this leaflet are people with a learning disability. The prevalence of hearing loss in people with a learning disability is up to 40% and this often goes un- or misdiagnosed. Hearing loss is the biggest causal factor in tinnitus. Up to 80% of people with tinnitus have a hearing loss. Tinnitus is a difficult condition to comprehend and deal with. People hear strange noises in their head that no one else can hear and yet they cannot articulate the problem. They may report feeling scared and confused, they become unable to sleep and find it difficult to cope. People with a learning disability struggling with their tinnitus are even more disadvantaged by the lack of information targeted at them to help them understand and cope. One support worker for a person with a learning disability told us their client’s GP believed that they had a mental illness, not tinnitus.

    It was reviewed by health writer and video producer, Ms Eleanor Stanley, who wrote:

    This resource will look quite different from some of the other entries for this year. But it looks the way it does because it has been co-designed and tailored to the preferences and needs of the user group in question (people with learning disabilities). The development process is exemplary because the team has clearly seen their end goal as not the resource itself – but as how people can change their lives, as a result of the resource. As a result the team have invested a lot of effort into the early stages and activities such as dissemination and evaluation, working with user groups to really get to the bottom of what the challenges are that people with learning disabilities face in this area, what can help, and how best to communicate this in a way that is accessible and has impact. This is a carefully thought out work tool designed to change people’s lives and for that it deserves a commendation.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Ethics - Winner

    After Someone Dies - coping with bereavement - Macmillan Cancer SupportAfter Someone Dies – Coping with Bereavement
    Macmillan Cancer Support

    This booklet aims to give: practical information about what to do when someone dies; emotional support for people who are preparing to or have lost a friend/relative to cancer and information for people supporting someone who’s grieving. The booklet is for: people preparing to lose a friend/ relative as a result of a cancer diagnosis; people who have lost a friend/relative as a result of a cancer diagnosis at any time and people supporting those who are grieving after the loss of a friend/ relative as a result of a cancer diagnosis.

    It was reviewed by the chair of the BMA medical ethics committee, Dr John W Chisholm, who wrote:

    This is a superb and exemplary resource that will prove very helpful to people dealing with or preparing for bereavement. The layout, structure, tone and content are all excellent. Additional sources of information are listed in detail. The division into sections and subsections means that it is easy to find a particular topic. The booklet is of a size and comprehensiveness that makes it a valuable source of reference as people progress through the stages of bereavement.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Ethics - Runner Up

    Genetic Testing and Hereditary Ovarian Cancer - Target Ovarian CancerGenetic Testing and Hereditary Ovarian Cancer
    Target Ovarian Cancer

    This guide aims to: inform and support women with ovarian cancer through the decision-making process of receiving genetic testing; to provide sources of support/signposting around the emotional and psychological impact a positive or negative result may have on them; to provide sources of support/signposting around the emotional and psychological impact a positive or negative result may have on their family; and to provide information about what their result may mean for possible treatment options and risk reducing options for other cancers. 15-20% of cases of ovarian cancer occur because of a genetic cause – a mutation in one or more genes known to increase the risk of ovarian cancer – that has been passed on by the mother or father. Our desk research showed that while there is a fair amount of information about the hereditary risk of breast cancer, there was a lack of information about the risk of ovarian cancer, and few women we spoke to knew of the risk. The information that was published already was not aimed at patients, but at health professionals. The guide contains information about hereditary ovarian cancer, how a woman can find out if her cancer is hereditary, how to access a genetic test, what the implications for the different results of a genetic test are for a woman and for her family members, what impact having a gene mutation can have on treatment for ovarian cancer, and what risk managing options there are for family members who might also carry the gene mutation. The intended audience is: all women diagnosed with ovarian cancer with or without a family history of the disease; women or men with a family history of ovarian/breast cancer who are considering testing; and women or men who have tested positive for a BRCA mutation.

    It was reviewed by the director of HeathSmith Consulting, Mrs Sarah Smith, who wrote:

    This resource deals with a complex and emotive subject matter very well, empowering women to make important decisions about their and their children’s futures. Great personal perspectives are included about the impact of genetic testing and the quotes and stories are a real strong point. Each section of questions and answers is clearly laid-out and straightforward, and it’s colour-coded to aid navigation. I liked that the photos aren’t stock images but are women with experience of ovarian cancer. They give a warmth and personal feel. It has a lot to commend it, and if I was a woman making the decision to be tested or suggesting a family member should be, it would be an invaluable resource. It’s clearly been influenced by women who have been though testing and the feedback from users has been really positive. Well done!

    Find out more


    Special Award - Innovation - Winner

    It Starts with Me - Terrence Higgins TrustIt Starts With Me
    Terrence Higgins Trust

    It Starts With Me is a seminal ‘supercampaign’ aiming to cut new HIV infections though promoting: condom use; increased testing; and starting treatment. The campaign provides HIV prevention and testing messages – focusing on testing, treatment and condoms, in ‘blasts’ which change each quarter. It features members of the target groups as faces of the campaign to mobilise others to take action. The more people who test for HIV, the more people will be diagnosed who didn’t know about their status. This means they can get onto treatment to: keep well and live a normal lifespan and also become uninfectious – people who are on treatment with an undetectable viral load cannot pass on HIV. Recent research (the START study) has found that people who start treatment before their CD4 count drops below 350 have a significantly lower risk of illness and death. To reflect this the British HIV Association guidelines have been updated to recommend everyone with HIV starts treatment regardless of their CD4 count. In addition the PARTNER study has found that people who are on treatment with an undetectable viral load cannot pass on HIV. These two pivotal studies have changed the landscape of HIV prevention with treatment becoming a leading element of protected sex alongside condom use. We want people to know the facts about how treatment helps stop the spread of HIV and also the different ways to test – including home testing and postal testing. The campaign features a range of resources – from advertising, booklets, posters, wallet cards and an interactive website to National HIV Testing Week. This takes place each November and raises awareness of the importance of HIV testing and increases opportunities to test in different settings. The campaign has also been broadened out to include Afro Caribbeans and people from Eastern European countries as we recognise that these communities are also affected disproportionately by HIV. Our resources are available in Swahili, Polish, French, Portuguese and Somali so that we can reach even more people. The campaign first began in 2011 and due to its success has been re-commissioned by Public Health England. Terrence Higgins Trust run the campaign but work in collaboration with other HIV organisations.

    It was reviewed by the chair of the BMA patient liaison group, Ms Amanda Cool, who wrote:

    ‘It Starts with Me is a super-campaign which was developed with the collaboration of many agencies.  It uses a commendably broad range of formats including print, social media, posters and billboards and an online campaign to deliver a simple, consistent message: HIV prevention ‘starts with me’. The graphics, images and personal video stories all support the importance of taking control of HIV prevention.  Not so long ago, the subject of sexually transmitted diseases and, in particular HIV, was taboo. To approach this in a very open way, to help people learn more about prevention as well as what to do about a positive test result, is quite remarkable.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Innovation - Runner Up

    Dementia Explained - Alzheimer's Research UKDementia Explained
    Alzheimer’s Research UK

    850,000 people in the UK have dementia and an estimated 2.3 million under 18s know someone with dementia. Dementia Explained is a website for children and teenagers who want to find out more about dementia, particularly children who have a relative or someone else in their lives with the condition. We wanted a resource that would help children to make sense of some of the changes that their relative/friend is going through and explain that these changes are the result of diseases that affect the brain. We asked children about the things that they would like to know about dementia and set out to answer the questions they had about the condition. By producing a range of resources including stories, videos, games and information pages, and providing an area in which they can share their own experiences, the site is designed to be as engaging as possible for children of different ages. Alzheimer’s Research UK polling indicates that less than three in 10 parents would feel very confident explaining dementia to their children. Dementia Explained is also a resource for parents to use to help them explain to their children how dementia affects people  

    It was reviewed by coach/mentor and immediate past chair of BMA Patient Liaison Group, Ms Catherine Macadam, who wrote:

    I think this is an exceptional resource because it fulfils a much-needed function – to explain dementia to young people – and the way it does it is beautiful to look at, a joy to use, very well-designed and easy to navigate. A huge amount of thought has gone into the creation of the resource by understanding the needs of the target audience and involving them in the creation and development of the resource, as well as providing interactive functions which allow users to contribute to it on a continuing basis. I particularly applaud the thought that has gone into providing information for the three different age categories and providing different ways of accessing the information. As someone who has been in the position of trying to help young children understand dementia in their grandparent I would have loved to have had this resource to use with them. I think the added value of this is that it not only explains, but encourages young people to be active about interacting with people with dementia and encourages a much greater openness about this topic which can be very difficult and confusing to talk about. Not only is the end product fantastic but the process of creating and designing it has been brilliant too.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Long-Term Conditions - Winner

    Information about Dying from Prostate Cancer - Prostate Cancer UKInformation about Dying from Prostate Cancer
    Prostate Cancer UK

    Every year 10,000 men die from prostate cancer in the UK. We developed digital information about dying from prostate cancer for men with advanced prostate cancer and their families. This included information about what to expect physically and emotionally, thinking and planning ahead, and supporting someone in their last months and weeks. The aim is that information users would feel that they had enough information about what to expect, what care is available, and where to get more information and support. We ensured that the resource meets this objective by researching user information needs and preferences, scoping other information resources, involving users and health professionals at every stage, and evaluating the information thoroughly.

    It was reviewed by the digital programme lead in the strategy and insight team at the BMA, Mr Mahesh Patel, who wrote:

    This is an excellent resource about a very challenging subject. The content is well-written and accessible, the website design is done well and renders well on a mobile. Links and connections to additional information are included.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Long-Term Conditions - Runner Up

    COPD: Living with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease - British Lung FoundationCOPD: Living with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
    British Lung Foundation

    The audience is people affected by COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), their families and carers. Our Respiratory Health of the Nation research highlighted that an estimated 1.2 million people are living with diagnosed COPD (about 2% of the UK’s population). The aim of this booklet is to provide reliable information about COPD, so that people affected have the knowledge to self-manage their condition and know where they can get support. It is written to give practical advice – answering questions such as what treatments work – and giving tips and quotes from other people living with COPD. More than half of the booklet sets out what people can do to manage their condition. It talks about ways to manage breathlessness, exercising and taking care of feelings. There’s also clear and graphic guidance about managing a flare-up. Chris and Ian also talk about their experience of living with COPD.

    It was reviewed by retired GP, Dr Gillian Summers, who wrote:

    This seemed to me an exceptionally clear and helpful leaflet. I wish it had been available back when I was a GP. I have already sent for one for a friend and, after looking at the website, actually made a small donation as I well remember my Grandad who had COPD from the gas and smoking in the trenches in WW1. This is an excellent leaflet. I can’t even find a constructive criticism to make!

    Find out more


    Special Award - Screening - Winner

    Genetic Testing and Hereditary Ovarian Cancer - Target Ovarian CancerGenetic Testing and Hereditary Ovarian Cancer
    Target Ovarian Cancer

    This guide aims to: inform and support women with ovarian cancer through the decision-making process of receiving genetic testing; to provide sources of support/signposting around the emotional and psychological impact a positive or negative result may have on them; to provide sources of support/signposting around the emotional and psychological impact a positive or negative result may have on their family; and to provide information about what their result may mean for possible treatment options and risk reducing options for other cancers. 15-20% of cases of ovarian cancer occur because of a genetic cause – a mutation in one or more genes known to increase the risk of ovarian cancer – that has been passed on by the mother or father. Our desk research showed that while there is a fair amount of information about the hereditary risk of breast cancer, there was a lack of information about the risk of ovarian cancer, and few women we spoke to knew of the risk. The information that was published already was not aimed at patients, but at health professionals. The guide contains information about hereditary ovarian cancer, how a woman can find out if her cancer is hereditary, how to access a genetic test, what the implications for the different results of a genetic test are for a woman and for her family members, what impact having a gene mutation can have on treatment for ovarian cancer, and what risk managing options there are for family members who might also carry the gene mutation. The intended audience is: all women diagnosed with ovarian cancer with or without a family history of the disease; women or men with a family history of ovarian/breast cancer who are considering testing; and women or men who have tested positive for a BRCA mutation.

    It was reviewed by the director of HeathSmith Consulting, Mrs Sarah Smith,  who wrote:

    This resource deals with a complex and emotive subject matter very well, empowering women to make important decisions about their and their children’s futures. Great personal perspectives are included about the impact of genetic testing and the quotes and stories are a real strong point. Each section of questions and answers is clearly laid-out and straightforward, and it’s colour-coded to aid navigation. I liked that the photos aren’t stock images but are women with experience of ovarian cancer. They give a warmth and personal feel. It has a lot to commend it, and if I was a woman making the decision to be tested or suggesting a family member should be, it would be an invaluable resource. It’s clearly been influenced by women who have been though testing and the feedback from users has been really positive. Well done!

    Find out more 


    Special Award - Screening - Runner Up

    Your Breath Test - British Lung FoundationYour Breath Test
    British Lung Foundation

    Our online breath test is a quick way for people to find out if they should get their breathlessness checked out by a healthcare professional. We want to: increase the public’s awareness that feeling short of breath can be a symptom of something more serious, including lung conditions and heart disease; encourage people to understand things that may affect their breathlessness; and drive earlier diagnosis. We help people to decide if their shortness of breath is worth checking out. And potentially how they can make changes to their lifestyle to reduce their feelings of being out of control of their breathing. We know that many people with lung conditions remain undiagnosed. Many people accept that feeling short of breath is part of getting older. Long-term breathlessness affects about 10% of the population and 30% of  older people. The test is completed online, and takes less than five minutes. At the end you get a personalised report, with the option for this to be emailed to you for future reference. It asks 10 questions based on the MRC breathlessness scale and other factors that can contribute to getting out of breath regularly. In addition to the main message, your results are tailored to give your BMI and relevant links to information on our website and elsewhere about breathlessness, exercise, eating well, help to quit smoking and dealing with anxiety.

    It was reviewed by freelance writer and editor, Mrs Louise Coghlin, who wrote:

    Thank you for the opportunity to review this interesting resource. The breath test you’ve created seems well-suited to achieving your aims in a way that is, I would imagine, quite ground-breaking. The development process you used seems excellent, especially the way you involved and learnt from so many users. The test itself seems really easy-to-use. This is a great resource and I hope it helps a lot of people to take action that changes their lives for the better.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Self-Care - Winner

    Move More: Your Guide to Becoming More Active - MacMillan Cancer SupportMove More: Your Guide to Becoming More Active
    Macmillan Cancer Support

    The Move more guide aims to encourage and support people who’ve had a cancer diagnosis in becoming more active. It also encourages family and friends involvement. The guide will increase knowledge and motivation, and provide the skills and tools to influence physical activity behavioural change.

    It was reviewed by the chief executive of Luto, Mr Wayne Middleton, who wrote:

    What a fantastic resource. The guide is well-put together with solid examples of professional and user involvement. A sound evaluation is planned. Not only is this a valuable resource for people living with cancer and their carers, but it would be great for the general public to use as well. I particularly liked the space given for the user to track their goals and activity, something that would encourage people to keep the book and read it.

    Find out more 


    Special Award - Self-Care - Runner Up

    Money and Mental Health hub - MindMoney and Mental Health hub
    Mind

    Money and mental health problems are often linked. We wanted to improve the information available to explain the link, to empower people to manage their finances, and in turn to try to help prevent a mental health problem occurring in the first place. We wanted to do this by creating a ‘one stop shop’ or ‘hub’ page for people to access all the information they need, along with personal stories to make it engaging. We kick-started the process by asking members of Mind’s online community Elefriends (elefriends.org.uk) to tell us any concerns they had around money and mental health. The response was rapid and extensive, and highlighted the areas which we needed to cover. It aims to explain the relationship between money worries and mental health and to provide advice and suggestions on how to address potential issues. It is aimed at anyone living with a mental health problem who is concerned about the impact on their finances, and the impact money problems may have on their mental health.

    It was reviewed by business communication trainer, Mr Nigel EC Grant, who wrote:

    This is an excellent website, an example that many would do well to study.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Trusts - Winner

    myTube – a patient information website to inform the decision to have a gastrostomy placed for people living with Motor Neurone Disease
    University of Sheffield in collaboration with staff from Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Optical Jukebox

    The myTube project had two key objectives. First, to offer a web-based education resource on gastrostomy tube feeding for people living with MND (motor neurone disease). Secondly, we wanted to further explore and develop our model of user-centred design and user-led research implementation. This involves taking current research and asking patients and carers to translate this back into user-friendly educational materials. The co-design process led to an educational resource rich in user-friendly information, offered in bite-sized sections, within an easy to navigate website structure. Videos are the chief mode of information delivery, enabling users to hear from other people living with MND using gastrostomy feeding tubes and view how they have adapted home enteral feeding into their day-to-day lives. The myTube website offers a new approach to patient education and decision support, melding best clinical practice and key research findings with the experiences of patients and carers, expressed through a range of engaging short documentary style films. Making the decision to have a gastrostomy feeding tube placed is a complex and emotive choice for patients to make. Recently the large scale, multi-centre research project, ProGas, specifically addressed the timing of gastrostomy feeding tube placement. The project team wished to build on the learnings of developing myNIV, a web-based information resource providing information to patients and carers about non-invasive ventilation (NIV) (www.niv.mymnd.org.uk). The strong ethos of user involvement had benefited the final output, and it was felt that this model could again be utilised and advanced for this clinical topic. Therefore, the same filmmakers and web-design experts who were involved in myNIV, were engaged again. They worked with patients, carers and healthcare professionals to develop a website to inform the decision to have a gastrostomy feeding tube placed. The current evidence base on gastrostomy use in MND was used as the foundation for the project, in particular the study recently published by the Sheffield MND Care and Research Centre which showed the benefits of early gastrostomy placement and conversely the harm from delayed gastrostomy. The principal investigator for this study, commissioned the development of myTube, with an aim to implement the research findings into practice. The aim was to enable the patient and carer working group to reinterpret the academic research outputs in light of their own lived experiences, and as a group translate these insights into an educational resource. myTube was intended to act as a resource to help inform and expedite discussions when patients were considering the placement of a gastrostomy feeding tube. It was not intended to replace decision support from an expert MND multidisciplinary team, rather supplement it and drive discussion of some of the key issues. By placing the voice of the patient and carer at the heart of the information offered, we aim to maximise engagement with the audience, allowing for an insight into life on home enteral feeding, backed up by input from clinicians. It aims to empower people living with MND and those with experience of caring for people living with MND to translate the research findings regarding gastrostomy feeding tube use into a user designed information resource to support individuals and to make decisions about whether or not to have a gastrostomy as well as to plan living with a gastrostomy and troubleshoot problems.

    It was reviewed by the director of the BMA patient Information Awards, Richard Jones, who wrote:

    I was very impressed by this resource. I admired its ambition and clearly stated objective to use patient stories to encourage change. The involvement of patients and their carers has been exemplary. Patients and carers were involved throughout the process: all key choices on the content and design of the recourse were user-led, with the design and clinical teams enabling this. It can also be seen in the videos which are centred on the patient experience. It is a visual adjunct to the academic study. One of the film makers, Cathy Soreny, is a registered nurse who talks about her passion to use the visual expression of patient stories to effect behaviour change. The website is very well-organised and the videos I looked at are well-produced but also compelling viewing: you can see the care that has gone into them. The Our Stories section includes introductory videos about the participants which are shot with great attention to detail and which use images to show the personalities of the participants (Trevor’s love of fishing for example). The video format is a perfect medium for instructional information but the videos which focus on difficult decisions are very moving as well.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Trusts - Runner Up

    Pre-Assessment and Operations - Evelina London Children’s HospitalPre-Assessment and Operations
    Evelina London Children’s Hospital (part of Guy’s and St Thomas’)

    Coming to hospital for an operation or planned test can feel scary and unfamiliar, especially for a child. What happens before your operation and On the day of your operation are specially made patient information films, designed to be watched by families with their child to help prepare them for a stay in hospital. The films fulfil three main objectives: preparing young people and their families for pre-assessment and a procedure or operation in a fun and friendly way to reduce anxiety; maximise staff time by providing practical information to families upfront, answering frequently asked questions in advance; supporting a project to improve pre-assessment waiting times by re-modelling the patient pathway. A review of patient information found that existing information was variable, excessive and repetitive. As a result of this review all information has been updated, including the films which provide information in an engaging and accessible format. If a child and their family are anxious it can lead to confusion and difficulties in the anaesthetic room directly before a procedure. When a parent becomes anxious it affects how a child behaves as they instinctively pick up on their feelings. Older children in particular can become combative, making it an unpleasant experience for all. Increased levels of anxiety can also cause a greater ‘stress response’ to surgery which is detrimental to recovery. Filmed at Evelina London Children’s Hospital and using real staff, the films aim to put families at ease by helping to combat the anxiety of the unknown. Presenting the information in a friendly, colourful and upbeat way, was a deliberate tactic to engage young people in a potentially daunting and scary topic. By being able to visualise their experience, coming into hospital should feel more familiar and less scary. There is very little time to psychologically prepare patients and their families for a procedure and anaesthetists do not routinely have time to visit wards. The films can support this by preparing a family before their visit, making sure that key information is delivered before a patient reaches the anaesthetic room. The films are relevant to a very wide audience – over 10,000 operations or procedures are carried out at Evelina London Children’s Hospital annually, with the majority requiring a pre-assessment.

    It was reviewed by the head librarian at Salisbury District Hospital, Mrs Jenny Lang, who wrote:

    This is an impressive and clearly effective resource. The idea was innovative and the consultant who initiated it went the extra mile to put in the effort to develop this resource. The engagement of the whole team of staff many of whom took part in the video shows commitment and enthusiasm for the idea. Their research showed that no other similar resources have been made. They have engaged a very professional company to produce the video and used user views and feedback to inform the content. It is a delightful production which I would be well-pleased to see if my child was going in to hospital. The team should be commended on their commitment and enthusiasm for this production, and their care and concern for their patients and their families. The involvement of patients and their families in its production adds to its value as you can be sure you are providing the right information in an accessible format for the intended audience. The plan for promotion, dissemination, and gathering of feedback and evaluation is very thorough, and it has clearly reached an intended and contented audience. Hopefully other hospitals will be able to follow your example.

    Find out more


    Special Award - User Engagement - Winner

    myTube – a patient information website to inform the decision to have a gastrostomy placed for people living with Motor Neurone Disease
    University of Sheffield in collaboration with staff from Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Optical Jukebox

    The myTube project had two key objectives. First, to offer a web-based education resource on gastrostomy tube feeding for people living with MND (motor neurone disease). Secondly, we wanted to further explore and develop our model of user-centred design and user-led research implementation. This involves taking current research and asking patients and carers to translate this back into user-friendly educational materials. The co-design process led to an educational resource rich in user-friendly information, offered in bite-sized sections, within an easy to navigate website structure. Videos are the chief mode of information delivery, enabling users to hear from other people living with MND using gastrostomy feeding tubes and view how they have adapted home enteral feeding into their day-to-day lives. The myTube website offers a new approach to patient education and decision support, melding best clinical practice and key research findings with the experiences of patients and carers, expressed through a range of engaging short documentary style films. Making the decision to have a gastrostomy feeding tube placed is a complex and emotive choice for patients to make. Recently the large scale, multi-centre research project, ProGas, specifically addressed the timing of gastrostomy feeding tube placement. The project team wished to build on the learnings of developing myNIV, a web-based information resource providing information to patients and carers about non-invasive ventilation (NIV) (www.niv.mymnd.org.uk). The strong ethos of user involvement had benefited the final output, and it was felt that this model could again be utilised and advanced for this clinical topic. Therefore, the same filmmakers and web-design experts who were involved in myNIV, were engaged again. They worked with patients, carers and healthcare professionals to develop a website to inform the decision to have a gastrostomy feeding tube placed. The current evidence base on gastrostomy use in MND was used as the foundation for the project, in particular the study recently published by the Sheffield MND Care and Research Centre which showed the benefits of early gastrostomy placement and conversely the harm from delayed gastrostomy. The principal investigator for this study, commissioned the development of myTube, with an aim to implement the research findings into practice. The aim was to enable the patient and carer working group to reinterpret the academic research outputs in light of their own lived experiences, and as a group translate these insights into an educational resource. myTube was intended to act as a resource to help inform and expedite discussions when patients were considering the placement of a gastrostomy feeding tube. It was not intended to replace decision support from an expert MND multidisciplinary team, rather supplement it and drive discussion of some of the key issues. By placing the voice of the patient and carer at the heart of the information offered, we aim to maximise engagement with the audience, allowing for an insight into life on home enteral feeding, backed up by input from clinicians. It aims to empower people living with MND and those with experience of caring for people living with MND to translate the research findings regarding gastrostomy feeding tube use into a user designed information resource to support individuals and to make decisions about whether or not to have a gastrostomy as well as to plan living with a gastrostomy and troubleshoot problems.

    It was reviewed by the director of the BMA patient Information Awards, Richard Jones, who wrote:

    I was very impressed by this resource. I admired its ambition and clearly stated objective to use patient stories to encourage change. The involvement of patients and their carers has been exemplary. Patients and carers were involved throughout the process: all key choices on the content and design of the recourse were user-led, with the design and clinical teams enabling this. It can also be seen in the videos which are centred on the patient experience. It is a visual adjunct to the academic study. One of the film makers, Cathy Soreny, is a registered nurse who talks about her passion to use the visual expression of patient stories to effect behaviour change. The website is very well-organised and the videos I looked at are well-produced but also compelling viewing: you can see the care that has gone into them. The Our Stories section includes introductory videos about the participants which are shot with great attention to detail and which use images to show the personalities of the participants (Trevor’s love of fishing for example). The video format is a perfect medium for instructional information but the videos which focus on difficult decisions are very moving as well.

    Find out more


    Special Award - User Engagement - Runner Up

    BECCA - Breast Cancer CareBECCA
    Breast Cancer Care

    62,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK every year, with more than eight out of 10 women surviving the diagnosis beyond five years. But, after the intensive programme of treatment, clinical visits and surgery, many women feel isolated and alone as their treatment ends and they are faced with the long-term impact of breast cancer. While many expect to be able to return to their lives as before and get ‘back to normal’, the physical and psychological impact of living with breast cancer can be profound, and often results in a marked fall in emotional and mental well-being in the months and years after their hospital treatment ends. Resources to support women in this position are often lacking. Consequently many tell us they are struggling to deal with fears of their cancer returning, and long-term side effects such as menopausal symptoms, fatigue and lymphodoema. This is the problem BECCA is designed to overcome. Our app uses human-centred design principles to create an app for anyone moving forward from breast cancer. Utilising technology that enables day-to-day activity suggestions and trusted information, BECCA enables people to better manage the impact of breast cancer and find their ‘new normal’ faster. The beta web app, launched in October, functions as a digital deck of cards. The information and suggestions within are all created with the assistance of specialist nurses and our expert staff, as well as the input of popular breast cancer bloggers. The design and functionality of the tool is to meet its users’ needs quickly and effectively, and inspire them to embrace a positive mind set and take small steps day-to-day, enabling them successfully to self-manage the impact of breast cancer and adjust to life beyond the disease.

    It was reviewed by freelance writer and editor, Mrs Louise Coghlin, who wrote:

    This is one of the most exciting and fresh things I have ever seen when reviewing resources for the BMA patient information awards. I am really impressed by everything about this resource. At the heart of the project is an admirable desire ‘to create something that isn’t simply innovative but actually meets a significant, outstanding need of the breast cancer community and improves their lives’. The way the applicant has gone about doing that – involving users in almost every way imaginable and drawing on such a wide range of high-quality information resources, as well as professional input – and I think the applicant’s ambition to make things even better, is exemplary. The resource itself seems very good indeed. I hope it helps a lot of people. We will find out, because the applicant has excellent plans to evaluate impact.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Young Adults - Winner

    Young Person's Guide to Lymphoma - Lymphoma AssociationYoung Person’s Guide to Lymphoma
    Lymphoma Association

    Lymphomas are the most common group of cancers in teenagers and young adults (15-24 years old) and the third most common group of cancers in childhood (0-14 years old), after leukaemia and brain tumours. Every year in the UK, about 150 children and more than 450 teenagers and young people develop lymphoma. Our booklet for teenagers and young people, called Young person’s guide to lymphoma, was due for revision. Health professionals rated it highly and in 2015-2016 we sent out more than 2,600 copies. But, while clinicians felt the content suited a young adult audience, some of them felt the design was childish. With the new edition, our key objective was to expand the appeal of the Young person’s guide to lymphoma to ensure it is a valuable resource for a broad teenage and young adult age group (13-24 years old), that informed them about their lymphoma and helped with self-care. After research, we arrived at three specific points we wanted the book to accomplish: to be useful – people liked to carry the information around, refer to it and share it with others and make notes; to provide easy to understand content in bite-size chunks that don’t overwhelm readers; people wanted to read relevant sections in isolation at a particular time, flick back to them when needed, skip sections entirely and find out where to get more information and to appeal to a wide age group.

    It was reviewed by the former executive director of the  Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group, Dr Sue E Ablett, who wrote:

    This is an outstanding publication. The content, layout, design, use of colour and navigational aids are exceptional. The result is a publication which the Lymphoma Association should be rightly proud of, but it is also one that would be immensely valuable to its target audience. It has a real ‘pick me up and read me’ feel to it, which I would see as particularly important given the age range of the target population. It is an outstanding publication, which has come a very long way from earlier editions. The feedback received has been employed to very good use. It contains a wealth of well-presented and valuable information, but it is in the layout and design that this publication really stands out. Exceptional in every way and I am delighted to see the continuing commitment to continue to make it available in hard copy for users, as well as an online version. As an information manager/ producer, now retired, I would have been extremely proud to have been associated with this publication. Many congratulations.

    Find out more


    Special Award - Young Adults - Runner Up

    Miscarriage - Support for Young People - The Miscarriage AssociationMiscarriage – Support for Young People
    The Miscarriage Association

    It is estimated that one in four pregnancies end in miscarriage. A further 2% are ectopic or molar pregnancies, in which the baby cannot survive. We tend to use the term ‘miscarriage’ to describe all these kinds of pregnancy loss. Our research showed that our information did not provide enough support for specific issues faced by young people in particular. They were often very isolated, unable to speak to family and without strong relationship support. The pregnancy may have been unplanned and people around them often viewed the loss as ‘lucky’. The purpose of the resource is to give relevant and accessible information on pregnancy loss for teenagers. The intended audience is young people – although some elements of the resources are relevant for our wider audience. The information was developed for 16-21 year olds but we hope that those under 16 will find them helpful too. Young people accessing the resource should feel more informed, less isolated and able to seek further help. After extensive consultation with young people we published a suite of resources for young people, accessed from a youth hub: an illustrated leaflet for young people available online and for use in schools, clinics, surgeries and hospitals. The leaflet reflects the experiences and needs that young women reported and includes a number of quotes from young women we spoke to; adapted information on miscarriage after unplanned pregnancy; a series of short films and a collection of written pieces featuring stories from young people who have experienced pregnancy loss; an infographic to make calling the Miscarriage Association helpline easier and overcome some of the uncertainty around what might happen on the call; and new page on talking about miscarriage (to parents, partners, teachers and health professionals).

    It was reviewed by Dr Hannah R Bridges of HB Health Comms Ltd who wrote:

    Wow! This is a wonderful example how good consultation and understanding your audience can lead to great quality information! The Miscarriage Association has identified a need for materials to support young people, who have different experiences and support needs. The consultation, planning, and promotional plans show excellence in producing health information. This shows through in the end products – high quality and extremely well-tailored to the audience. The insight and thought that has gone into this is commendable. Take for example the ‘what happens when you call our helpline’ page – simple, highly visual, concise and reassuring information to encourage young people in need of support to dare to pick up the phone – the overall impression is one of kindness. Just wonderful.

    Find out more


    BMA Patient Information Reviewer of Year Award

    Mrs Sarah Smith of HealthSmith Consulting

    Sarah Smith is an independent consumer health information specialist who is director of Healthsmith Consulting. Before this she spent a decade working in the voluntary sector for two health charities: the National Eczema Society and the Blood Pressure Association (now Blood Pressure UK). She was also the operations director at the Patient Information Forum for six years until October 2014.


    Our judging panel has also shortlisted numerous additional resources for their excellence and value.

  • Highly Commended resources

    Highly commended resources

    Title Internet resources

    Your mind matters
    Age UK

    Find out more

    The Story of Neuroman and Selective Dorsal Rhizotomy
    Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust

    Find out more

    Dementia Explained
    Alzheimer's Research UK

    Find out more

    Work and finance: Before, during and after a stem cell transplant
    Anthony Nolan

    Find out more

    Feelings Matter: Emotional Wellbeing and Arthritis
    Arthritis Care

    Find out more

    Eating well with neutropenia: A guide for people with blood cancer
    Bloodwise

    Find out more

    Your guide to clinical trials
    Bloodwise

    Find out more

    Primary Bone Cancer: Website Resources
    Bone Cancer Research Trust

    Find out more

    Simple steps for good bowel health
    Bowel Cancer UK

    Find out more

    Your diet and lifestyle: living with and beyond bowel cancer
    Bowel Cancer UK

    Find out more

    Subarachnoid Haemorrhage: a guide for patients and carers
    Brain & Spine Foundation

    Find out more

    How is Primary Breast Cancer Treated?
    Breast Cancer Care

    Find out more

    Primary breast cancer resource pack
    Breast Cancer Care

    Find out more

    Your body, intimacy and sex
    Breast Cancer Care

    Find out more

    Health information Series
    British Heart Foundation

    Find out more

    A diary of heart valve surgery
    British Heart Foundation, Heart Matters magazine

    Find out more

    First steps to living with COPD
    British Lung Foundation

    Find out more

    Living with pulmonary fibrosis: What you need to know
    British Lung Foundation

    Find out more

    Your home and your lungs
    British Lung Foundation

    Find out more

    Childhood Cancer Drugs Factsheets
    Children's Cancer & Leukaemia Group (CCLG)

    Find out more

    Managing family life and cancer
    Children's Cancer & Leukaemia Group (CCLG)

    Find out more

    My child has a brain or spinal tumour: A guide for parents and carers
    Children's Cancer & Leukaemia Group (CCLG)

    Find out more

    Cystic fibrosis is here for schools
    Cystic Fibrosis Trust

    Find out more

    School and cystic fibrosis: a guide for parents from pre-school to primary
    Cystic Fibrosis Trust

    Find out more

    Lungs At Work Website
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust

    Find out more

    Type 1 diabetes: School Residential Trip Tool
    Diabetes UK

    Find out more

    Animations for children
    Epilepsy Action

    Find out more

    Could you have Fibroids?
    Guy's & St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

    Find out more

    Keeping safe: Managing suicidal thoughts
    Guy's & St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

    Find out more

    Understanding Prosthetic Reconstruction
    Guy's & St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

    Find out more

    Supporting children when a parent has had a brain injury
    Headway - the brain injury association

    Find out more

    Lack of insight after brain injury
    Headway – the brain injury association

    Find out more

    Pocket size: ART and quality of life
    HIV i-Base

    Find out more

    UK Guide to PrEP
    HIV i-Base

    Find out more

    Primary Hyperparathyroidism
    Hypopara UK

    Find out more

    Care after stroke or transient ischaemic attack: what, when and why? Information for patients and their carers
    Intercollegiate Stroke Working Party, Royal College of Physicians

    Find out more

    The Fontan procedure or Total Cavopulmonary Connection (TCPC)
    Little Hearts Matter

    Find out more

    Lymphoma TrialsLink
    Lymphoma Association

    Find out more

    A patient's guide to head and neck aftercare service
    Lynda Jackson Macmillan Centre

    Find out more

    Coping, now your chemotherapy is finishing
    Lynda Jackson Macmillan Centre

    Find out more

    Using moxa to reduce the side effects of chemotherapy
    Lynda Jackson Macmillan Centre

    Find out more

    CHANGE Cancer Series Easy Read booklet
    Macmillan Cancer Support

    Find out more

    Serious Drinking: Alcohol Made Easy
    Men's Health Forum

    Find out more

    Mermaids Website
    Mermaids

    Find out more

    Find the Words: Talking to your GP about mental health
    Mind

    Find out more

    Making sense of mindfulness
    Mind

    Find out more

    Olly Being Brave And Chemotherapy
    Molly Olly's Wishes

    Find out more

    Olly The Brave And The Wigglys
    Molly Olly's Wishes

    Find out more

    So what is MND, anyway? A guide for young people affected by motor neurone disease (MND)
    Motor Neurone Disease Association

    Find out more

    Supporting children and young people close to someone with motor neurone disease (MND)
    Motor Neurone Disease Association

    Find out more

    Cerebral Venous Thrombosis (CVT)
    Mr James Keitley and Dr Martin Punter of Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust

    Find out more

    For family and friends: when someone close to you has MS
    MS Society

    Find out more

    Disease modifying therapies (DMTs) for MS
    MS Society

    Find out more

    Understanding Progressive MS
    MS Society

    Find out more

    Neuromuscular conditions family information videos
    Muscular Dystrophy UK

    Find out more

    An Infopack for carers of myeloma patients
    Myeloma UK

    Find out more

    Nutrition
    NAM

    Find out more

    So What's It Like Having a Cochlear Implant: the Experiences of Adults
    National Cochlear Implant Users Association (NCIUA)

    Find out more

    Hearing Aids: Information for families
    National Deaf Children's Society

    Find out more

    Understanding Your Child's Hearing Tests: A guide to the hearing and medical tests that are used to find out the type, level and cause of deafness
    National Deaf Children's Society

    Find out more

    I quit – Stop smoking when you're pregnant
    NHS Health Scotland

    Find out more

    Depression and Low Mood – a guide for partners
    Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust and OnePlusOne

    Find out more

    Clinical trials for pancreatic cancer (website)
    Pancreatic Cancer UK

    Find out more

    Pain and pancreatic cancer
    Pancreatic Cancer UK

    Find out more

    The Parkinson Magazine (Winter 2016/2017)
    Parkinson's UK

    Find out more

    Why do some men leak after surgery?  How to manage leaking urine – an artificial urinary sphincter.  How to manage leaking urine – an internal sling
    Prostate Cancer UK

    Find out more

    Understanding your prostate cancer
    Prostate Cancer UK

    Find out more

    Rita May's Story: Radiotherapy at Weston Park Hospital
    Radiotherapy Department, Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

    Find out more

    Personality Disorders
    Rethink Mental Illness (Advice and Information Service)

    Find out more

    Recovery
    Rethink Mental Illness (Advice and Information Service)

    Find out more

    Travelling, going on holiday and lung cancer
    Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

    Find out more

    Living with lung cancer
    Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

    Find out more

    Targeted therapies for lung cancer
    Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

    Find out more

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 4
    Spinal Muscular Atrophy Support UK

    Find out more

    Anxiety – Easy read information
    St Nicholas Hospital

    Find out more

    Preparing for Your Child's Surgery
    Steps Charity

    Find out more

    Childhood Stroke Handbook
    Stroke Association and Evelina London Children's Hospital

    Find out more

    Active Ostomates: Sport and Fitness After Stoma Surgery
    The Colostomy Association

    Find out more

    Managing JIA in School (juvenile idiopathic arthritis)
    The National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society

    Find out more

    Reduced fetal movement campaign/Movements matter
    Tommy’s

    Find out more

    Your teeth you are in control
    University of Sheffield

    Find out more

    Advance care planning: A record of your wishes and preferences 'Just A Thought'
    Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust

    Find out more

    Childhood epilepsy: A Guide for Parents
    Young Epilepsy

    Find out more