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Patient information awards winners

2019 BMA Patient Information Awards

 

 

Our final judging panel chooses the patient resource of the year award from a wide range of resources.

Several special awards are also assigned to the best resources in certain categories. Overall, fourteen special award first prizes and runner up prizes were made from the rest of the highly commended awards, including a new award for information on community care.

BMA president, Professor Raanan Gillon, presented the awards at a reception at BMA House on 10 September 2019.

Download the 2019 awards ceremony programme

Patient groups and charities who would like to enter the awards next year should contact Richard Jones in the BMA Library on [email protected].

  • BMA patient resource of the year

    BMA Patient Information Resource of the Year

    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

    Axial spondyloarthritis know-how (ASK) self-management toolkit  

    BMA Patient Information Resource of the Year 2019

    Axial Spondyloarthritis Know-how (ASK) is a single attendance self-management workshop at Guy’s Hospital for those living with the long-term inflammatory arthritis condition called AS (axial spondyloarthritis). The overarching objective of the ASK self-management toolkit is to deliver a range of high quality, sustainable and person-centred educational resources which are flexible, offer choice and match the health behaviour preference of the individual based on the self-management principles of The problem with… and Any Questions? …Just ASK. As affects young adults in their most productive years, the flexible format for dissemination of the ASK self-management toolkit aims to provide the ‘one stop approach’ to the delivery of self-management education with the suite of ASK resources wrapped around the single attendance to the two hour group workshop. A link to the ASK self-management toolkit is sent as a SMS message to patients prior to attendance.

    A novel feature and important aspect of the ASK self-management programme is the provision of a range of both written and digital resources. As the journey to diagnosis and experience of living with AS varies greatly, the ASK self-management toolkit aims to offer a range of resources, in multimedia formats, suited to the needs of the individual. They are based on the self-management principle of problem-solving, health-behaviour change, shared decision-making and goal-setting. A link to the ASK self-management toolkit is sent as a SMS message to patients prior to attendance. The link is to the ASK webpage on Guy’s and St Thomas’ public website which hosts all the toolkit materials: a short educational ASK film to be viewed prior to attending the workshop; digital interactive PDF copy of the ASK self-management Handbook available prior to attendance; the ASK Self-Management Assessment Tool – an online assessment tool capturing exercise behaviour, attitudes to exercise, smoking status, self-efficacy and emotional well-being in a short digital questionnaire-style to be completed prior to attendance and at three, six and 12 months following attendance to maintain support.

    This was reviewed by Stafford GP Peter Glennon, who commented: 

    "I was very impressed by this substantial and comprehensive self-management toolkit for patients with AS. Although it is designed to be used in conjunction with attendance at a physio group session at Guy’s/St Thomas’ it deserves a much wider rollout potentially to all patients in the UK with the condition. The digital format should make this easily achievable. As well as providing copious and clear information about the condition, perhaps more importantly, it gives the reader a very practical set of resources for making and maintaining lifestyle changes. It could also provide lifelong support for the patient to record, reflect upon, and monitor their illness and empower their self-sufficiency. I feel the model could also be easily adaptable to other chronic rheumatic disorders. This is an ambitious and exciting toolkit."  

    Chair of the BMA PLG (patient liaison group) Lesley Bentley commented:

    "The Axial Spondyloarthritis Know-how (ASK) toolkit provides a really useful way for patients to feel supported in gaining a good understanding of their condition and how it may affect their way of life.  Being given an opportunity to exchange experiences and ideas with other patients at the outset is invaluable, as is the wide range of practical information provided by the toolkit on how to self-manage the condition."

    Contact Melanie Martin MSc MCSP, Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist Musculoskeletal Assessment for further details. Melanie’s email address is [email protected]

     

  • All category winners

    Accessibility award first prize

    HSC Hospital Passport
    Public Health Agency

    Accessibility Award First Prize

    Guidelines produced in 2014 by GAIN (Guidelines and Audit Implementation Network) on caring for people with a learning disability identified specific areas for improvement, which included that ‘a regional hospital passport for people with learning disabilities should be developed and made available routinely for use when people with learning disabilities are in contact with general hospitals across Northern Ireland.

    The PHA (Public Health Agency) worked with stakeholders to develop a single regional hospital passport for people with a learning disability, with guidance notes. The passport allows the person with a learning disability or their carer to give important information on their individual needs and preferences. Its aim is to encourage hospital staff to make reasonable adjustments for patients with a learning disability in order to provide person-centred,effective and equitable care. It includes elements relating to patient safety eg. medications,communication, choking, mobility, keeping safe and pain recognition and management. Reasonable adjustments – like speaking more slowly or allowing more time – improve communication,reduce distress and make the hospital experience less confusing for people with a learning disability.This also enables the individual to feel as involved as possible in shared decisions about their care.

    It was reviewed by the managing director of thiNK now Ltd Nicola M King who commented:

    "I think this is a niche product with a clear purpose that achieves what it sets out to do. It has used a wide range of experts from different perspectives and it is clear that the draft was piloted with its users and changes made in response to feedback."

    Find out more

     

    Accessibility award runner up

    Finding out you have lymphoma - Easy Read version
    Lymphoma Action

    Accessibility Award Runner Up

    Lymphoma is the fifth most common cancer and typically affects people from 15-25 years or over 55 years. We wanted to produce a resource for people who are looking for accessible and asy-to-read information on the topic. This may include people with learning difficulties or cognitive impairment, people whose first language is not English and people with lower literacy levels. The objective was therefore to create information that makes the complex topic of lymphoma understandable with minimal support. We did this by using simple language,large print and supporting all the concepts with bespoke illustrations and photographs.

    It was reviewed by patient information specialist at Capita Nargis S Mandry who commented:

    "A good range of people with learning disabilities and dementia have been involved in testing the booklet. There is a good plan of action in place to promote it using third parties and social media as well as contacting organisations directly."

    Find out more

     

    Children award first prize

    The Itchy-saurus
    Dr Rosie Wellesley and Pavilion Books Ltd

    Children Award First Prize

    Eczema affects a fifth of children in developed countries and its prevalence is increasing. Managing eczema takes time and can be stressful for parents and children alike and requires tenacious self-care. Commercially available picture books are often used to help children understand an issue (the arrival of a new sibling; toilet training,etc), yet children’s bookshops had no picture books about eczema. Many of the educational tools about eczema management are targeted at the parents not the children.

    We wanted to produce a high quality picture book where eczema features in the story. Its aim was to be fun enough to read for pleasure but to also have an educational message that normalises eczema for those who have it,while familiarising others with the condition. Most importantly, we wanted the illustrations to be appealing and of excellent quality: it has to be a book that parents and children have the chance to fall in love with and want to re-visit for its own sake.

    It was reviewed by patient information specialist at Capita Nargis S Mandry who commented:

    "This is a wonderful, well-written story and I can imagine it will appeal to young readers. Most importantly young children will understand the need to avoid scratching and allow parents to bathe them and put cream on their body. Also, the book deals very nicely with ‘feeling irritable’ and ‘angry’.Eczema can impact on their quality of life and sleep and this book deals with these areas very well."

    Find out more

     

    Children award runner up

    Starting Secondary School comic         
    Cystic Fibrosis Trust

    Children Award Runner Up

    The comic was created for 10-11 year olds living with CF (cystic fibrosis) before they start secondary school and is part of a wider suite of resources which include information for parents and teachers. This can be a time of heightened anxiety as, on top of the usual stresses of starting a new school, children will often be expected to start taking more responsibility for their medications at school. It is also a time when many young people tell us that they first feel as though CF is ‘holding them back’ as hospital admissions may become more frequent and physical activity may become more difficult.

    We wanted to create a fun, youth-led resource which would help children with CF navigate these anxieties in a light-touch way. Following advice from our Youth Advisory Group it was important to take a holistic approach and embed CF information alongside advice about increasing homework, making friends and mental health. Case studies from other young people with CF are included to reduce the isolation felt by children. The comic also includes stickers which signpost to child-friendly information about CF that children can give to friends.

    It was reviewed by Richard Jones who commented:

    "This is an excellent resource which is clearly targeted at a life-stage event. The practical tips are based on the experiences on the youth advisory team who contributed to the resource.The production standard is high, and the resource is readable and usable. There is a good mix of content including funny facts, tips on stress and a weekly planner."

    Find out more

     

    Community care award first prize

    Which? Later Life Care     
    Which?

    Community Care Award First Prize 

    Which? Later Life Care is a free website from the consumer organisation that enables people to make decisions about care choices for later life.The site offers a unique blend of practical advice guides, real-life stories and tailored step-by-step tools to provide support, guidance and trusted information for people making decisions at an often emotional and difficult time. More than forty guides provide guidance on home care,financing care, housing options and end of life.There is also a section for family carers, to give them the support that they need as well as for those they are caring for. The information aims to provide the right details at the right time, depending on people’s needs. To aid with their decision making, the site provides videos,checklists and downloadable information to share with others. We also signpost people to other charities and organisations where they can get more detailed support. Real-life stories across the site give the human side of what can often be emotional and difficult decisions.

    A care services directory enables people to search across the UK for local care homes, domiciliary care agencies and support for people living with dementia.Furthermore, the tool helps self-funders calculate how long their funds will last and what their choices will be. Depending on the outcome, we provide next steps information to lead them on to appropriate guidance.

    It was reviewed by Stella Barnes who commented:

    "A great resource for older adults and their families to get clearly written explanations of all the issues related to care in later life. It has used a good spread of relevant experienced professionals and representatives. Patient stories used throughout to illustrate the information being given. The patient/client/family stories illustrate how difficult it can be to navigate the care system and how complicated, expensive and limited it can be. It shows the pitfalls which website users can be aware of and prepare for."

    Find out more

     

    Community care award runner up

    Care companion
    Global Initiative, June 2018

    Community Care Award Runner Up

    Care Companion is a web-based suite providing tailored support to an ever-growing population of non-professional carers in the home. Starting in Warwickshire, Coventry and Rugby, the project is transforming the lives of unpaid carers and their cared for, whilst drastically reducing the number of avoidable hospital admissions. This goes to ease pressure on the NHS front line services. According to the Office for National Statistics, unpaid carers provide social care worth £57 billion a year in the UK. Care Companion is a confident, sustainable solution to one of the country’s biggest and most poorly-addressed problems.

    After two years of development, features are being refined based on user feedback from the care panel. It is actively being used by over 300 carers, in preparation for roll-out to all of Warwickshire. We also plan to incorporate Care Companion, allowing its adoption by CCGs nationwide. Carers have almost universally praised the tool for opening up a previously restricted environment and allowing them to feel connected and supported once more. Care Companion is free to users and available for every step of their journeys.

    It was reviewed by coach/mentor Catherine Macadam who commented: 

    "I think this is a brilliant resource and can see it being a major source of help and support for carers in the region. As a concept I think it has the potential to be rolled out to other areas where it can be populated with locally relevant information as well as the more general resources which will apply to anyone. The process which generated the idea for the resource, and then developed the project and tested it, is extremely well-thought-out and is a great example of how a resource can be co-produced with its target audience. I also particularly like the fact that the resource itself becomes tailored to the needs and interests of each individual user and is actively seeking regular feedback and suggestions for further content.A really great example of an empowering way of providing information simply and in a targeted way to people who by the nature of their role have very little time, and do not always remember to look after themselves. The provision of a diary to keep track of things that happen, and a personal address book is a great help."

    Find out more

     

    Decision-making award first prize

    Clinical trials for lymphoma
    Lymphoma Action, December 2018

    Decision-Making Award First Prize

    There are over 60 types of lymphoma and around 19,500 people have a diagnosis each year in the UK. Clinical trials are an important treatment option for people with lymphoma, particularly those with rare or difficult to treat lymphomas or lymphoma that has not responded or has comeback after previous treatments. Clinical trials can be difficult to understand, yet they are the only way to improve treatment for lymphoma. Clinicians want information to enable people to understand what clinical trials involve and to help them decide whether they might be a suitable course of action.

    The booklet was written for anyone affected by lymphoma who is considering entering a clinical trial. It aims to: explain what clinical trials are, how they work and what it means to take part in one in an easy-to-understand format; empower people to make an informed decision on whether taking part in a clinical trial might be right for them; demystify trials, thereby encouraging more people to take part, and provide information on recent lymphoma research.

    It was reviewed by pharmaceutical physician Elizabeth Hancox who commented:

    "This is a really good overall summary and lists of questions; a great resource. It includes good lay descriptions, great question lists and explains howto get more information."

    Find out more

     

    Decision-making award runner up

    Their story, your choice
    Terrence Higgins Trust, February 2018

    Their Story, Your Choice is a pioneering new way of using interactive film to tackle HIV stigma in black African communities who are disproportionately affected by HIV. By inviting the viewer to participate and make choices for the characters, Their Story,Your Choice challenges assumptions and attitudes around HIV. The films seeks to encourage behaviour change in relation to HIV testing and treatment in order to reduce undiagnosed HIV and late diagnosis and encourage HIV testing. The aim is to amplify the voices of those living with HIV and to promote healthy relationships. Three interactive films were made using actors to portray facts, characters,relationships and lived experiences of black African people living with HIV in the UK. The films use innovative digital technologies together with a popular tradition in black African communities,that of story-telling. HIV stigma is a major barrier to black African people testing for HIV and contributes to high rates of late diagnosis.

    Each story in the films has various possible outcomes depending on choices viewers make for the characters in the film. Themes cover: disclosure/talking about HIV in relationships, late diagnosis, dating, and abuse.The films have been designed to be watched online on mobile phone, tablet or computer. Each film has eight possible endings depending on the choices viewers make for the characters in the films. At the end of each story line, viewers are encouraged to go back to the beginning and try out different choices.The films were scripted in a compelling ‘soap opera’ style and geared to appeal to a wide range of audiences to enable stealth-like learning. The films are subtitled to support low literacy, English as a second language and silent viewing. Viewers are encouraged to share the films on social media, post questions to the charity in confidence, or take an HIV test.

    It was reviewed by Luto chief executive Wayne Middleton who commented:

    "I enjoyed reviewing this fantastic resource with great interactive style. I like the high-quality production of the videos. Well done to the team involved. This is an interesting resource which has been well-designed by THT and is a good example of user involvement. It is exceptional."

    Find out more

     

    Equality, diversity and inclusion award first prize

    Can’t pass it on campaign
    Terrence Higgins Trust, July 2018

    Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Award First Prize

    Can’t Pass It On is a myth-busting multi-channel campaign aiming to end HIV stigma and cut HIV transmissions. The campaign responded to two seminal findings: conclusive proof that people on effective HIV treatment can’t pass on the virus,and that only 9% of the British public know this. Terrence Higgins Trust believed the research proven fact had the potential to be life-changing for people living with HIV by helping to breakdown the stigma and fear around HIV. The Can’t Pass It On message transforms the landscape of HIV prevention, turning traditional abstinence/protection health campaign messaging on its head: HIV treatment itself is now the most vital new way to prevent HIV transmission. By raising awareness about this message and ensuring the voices of people living with HIV are heard, the campaign took aim at HIV stigma. Out-dated beliefs about HIV transmission fuel stigma and discrimination, which not only hurts people living with HIV, but prevents people coming forward for testing. Getting more people to test is vital as one in seven people living with HIV don’t know they have it. The Can’t Pass It On campaign featured real people with and without HIV from communities that experience high levels of HIV: men who have sex with men and black Africans.

    We created two videos online featuring the same models talking about their experiences of living with HIV – Horcelie’s Story and Sadiq’s Story. People were encouraged to help share the message by downloading a social media toolkit and sharing images and slogans. The Can’t Pass It On campaign refreshed a previously successful social media campaign of 2016, turning the message into an integrated ‘super campaign’,including content, email, outdoor display advertising and social media channels.

    It was reviewed by i-base senior editor Simon Collins who commented:

    "This is multi-resource campaign to improve awareness about HIV. The videos are excellent as are the images in the A4 leaflet and website. Good to see this important information being more widely publicised. Plans to disseminate include medical journals, social media, street campaigns,organisations etc."

    Find out more

     

    Equality, diversity and inclusion award runner up

    Everybody’s Different
    Ectodermal Dysplasia Society and EnvisionPharma Group, September 2018

    Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Award Runner Up

    This resource aims to help explain ED (ectodermal dysplasia) to children and their peers. It introduces the genetic origin of ED, looks at common symptoms and suggests ways in which friends and teachers can provide support to children who have ED. The booklet has been read, amended and edited by members of the ED Society who either have ED, are parents of children who are affected by ED and the graphics designers. The evaluation of the impact is based on the need for information for children who have ED, their peers, teachers and parents to help explain about ED, the symptoms and how they can help support the child affected by ED and prevent bullying.

    It was reviewed by consultant surgeon at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Birmingham Andrew Young who commented:

    "I think this is a very well-done book with good length, appropriate for its target, well-illustrated,well-printed, and the good glossy format would appeal to children, engage them, but importantly not scare them off. This is a complex topic and the team have drawn upon the combined expertise of multiple professionals from dermatologists to dentists to psychologists. This resource is really very good; an introduction rather than trying to convey too much information. It has child friendly words and graphics. The format almost makes it look like a bedside story which is thus a much less daunting format for children. It would not look out of place on a child’s bookshelf."

    Find out more

     

    Ethics award first prize

    Finding your way with bereavement
    Motor Neurone Disease Association,December 2018

    Ethics Award First Prize

    Finding your way with bereavement is intended for former main carers, family members and friends of people with MND (motor neurone disease). Anticipatory grief is very common among families affected by MND because of its rapidly progressive nature. Families may wish to read the booklet together, to help them understand the challenges that may lie ahead. When a loved one is living with MND, grieving can begin from the day of diagnosis. It is common for carers to feel completely bewildered and lost when their love done dies of MND. The daily contact with health and social care professionals stops suddenly, and the duties of 24 hour caring now cease. Finding your way with bereavement aims to help bereaved people feel that they are not alone in what they are experiencing, and that these emotions are natural. There are many quotes from other people whose loved ones have died of MND to help to reduce isolation and support bereaved carers. It also recognises the health of carers and family members and encourages them throughout to get their own health checked. This was the first output of an Association-wide project on improving our services for bereaved people.

    It was reviewed by specialty doctor palliative medicine and portfolio GP Jane Brundish who commented:

    "This booklet is a phenomenal achievement and will undoubtedly positively impact on the illness journey of those alongside patients with MND. It is well-researched and striking how clinical evidence,cultural needs and psycho-social factors have been added to personal experiences to provide a guide that acknowledges emotional pain and grief from the point of diagnosis. It allows care givers and support network of the patient to grieve along the journey within a supported network of advice,resources and practical help. It provides a wealth of knowledge and support in a discreet and gentle manner ensuring that people do not feel isolated by their emotions and challenges. Many aspects of this booklet could be transferred to other life-limiting illnesses. It is already receiving much positive feedback. I am sure this will continue and become highly recognised and regarded. It was a pleasure to review – informative and inspiring."

    Find out more

     

    Ethics award runner up

    Planning ahead: my treatment and care
    Compassion in Dying, April 2018

    Ethics Award Runner Up

    Planning Ahead: My treatment and care is Compassion in Dying’s flagship publication.Officially endorsed by the Royal College of Nursing, it explains in simple language the information people need to understand how treatment and care decisions are made, how they can plan ahead to ensure they stay in control of these decisions,and who to talk to and share their wishes with. It also includes answers to the common concerns that we hear through Compassion in Dying’s free information line such as, ‘can anyone override my wishes?’, ‘what will happen in the future if I plan ahead now?’, and ‘is it expensive to plan ahead?’Planning Ahead provides clear information on Advance Statements, Advance Decision to Refuse Treatment, Lasting Power of Attorney for Health and Welfare and Do Not Attempt Resuscitation orders.

    The booklet also signposts people to the relevant free forms, available from Compassion in Dying, and offers on-going support from our information line service thereby offering in depth tailored support in addition to the practical information provided in the publication. Planning Ahead outlines people’s rights under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 to plan ahead – relevant for England and Wales – but can be used by anyone to gather general information about how to discuss,plan and share preferences for treatment and care.To ensure that the information is accessible, the booklet is written in plain English, broken down into manageable chunks, with lots of white space and illustrations which have been designed to portray the diversity of the desired audience. Wherever possible, we have avoided all medical or legal terminology to make the booklet suitable for a lay audience. Where specialised terminology is used,we have defined each word clearly. We have also chosen to repeat some specialised terminology and phrases to make the reader more familiar with these terms.

    It was reviewed by specialty doctor palliative medicine and portfolio GP Jane Brundish who commented:

    "This is a useful resource in the series from Compassion in Dying. Much confusion lies around advance care planning and this document highlights the need and benefit to express and document wishes. It is legally and clinically sound and has threads of real patient experience. It adds depth to discussions and decisions made in care settings. It is a good size and well-structured. The need for such a document has arisen from patients’information need regarding decision making and also a nationwide move to increase discussion and care planning. The nature of this resource is to provoke thought and understanding of need to consider care wishes. It also guides the reader as to how to access the forms relevant to them."

    Find out more

     

    Innovation award first prize

    Their story, your choice
    Terrence Higgins Trust, February 2018

    Their Story, Your Choice is a pioneering new way of using interactive film to tackle HIV stigma in black African communities who are disproportionately affected by HIV. By inviting the viewer to participate and make choices for the characters, Their Story,Your Choice challenges assumptions and attitudes around HIV. The films seeks to encourage behaviour change in relation to HIV testing and treatment in order to reduce undiagnosed HIV and late diagnosis and encourage HIV testing. The aim is to amplify the voices of those living with HIV and to promote healthy relationships. Three interactive films were made using actors to portray facts, characters,relationships and lived experiences of black African people living with HIV in the UK. The films use innovative digital technologies together with a popular tradition in black African communities,that of story-telling. HIV stigma is a major barrier to black African people testing for HIV and contributes to high rates of late diagnosis.

    Each story in the films has various possible outcomes depending on choices viewers make for the characters in the film. Themes cover: disclosure/talking about HIV in relationships, late diagnosis, dating, and abuse.The films have been designed to be watched online on mobile phone, tablet or computer.

    Each film has eight possible endings depending on the choices viewers make for the characters in the films. At the end of each story line, viewers are encouraged to go back to the beginning and try out different choices.The films were scripted in a compelling ‘soap opera’ style and geared to appeal to a wide range of audiences to enable stealth-like learning. The films are subtitled to support low literacy, English as a second language and silent viewing. Viewers are encouraged to share the films on social media, post questions to the charity in confidence, or take an HIV test.

    It was reviewed by Luto chief executive Wayne Middleton who commented:

    "I enjoyed reviewing this fantastic resource with  great interactive style. I like the high-quality production of the videos. Well done to the team involved. This is an interesting resource which has been well-designed by THT and is a good example of user involvement. It is exceptional."

    Find out more

     

    Innovation award runner up

    Breast Cancer Care app (BECCA)
    Breast Cancer Care, May 2017

    Innovation Award Runner Up

    In consultation with people who have faced the daunting experience of rebuilding their lives after breast cancer, we co-created a mobile app to support those confronting this challenging transition. Delivering reliable strategies, hints and tips to the user, BECCA (Breast Cancer Care app)aims to empower and equip people to adjust to life beyond breast cancer treatment.

    Following months of treatment, people expect finishing hospital treatment to be the end of breast cancer. However, many find themselves facing a difficult time as they try to adapt to an altered body image, feelings of isolation, former responsibilities, the fear of recurrence, and physical side effects including lymphoedema and menopausal symptoms. BECCA was launched to help people adapt and adjust to these symptoms and concerns with confidence.It provides information, support and inspiration in a simple and digestible way with easy-to-use flashcards. It includes personal stories, podcasts,videos and other trusted information and support pages. It is organised into 11 categories, from beauty and exercise to symptoms and concerns, to help users find the information and support they need with ease.

    It was reviewed by Richard Jones who commented:

    "This is an excellent app which has been carefully designed to meet user needs. It is easy to use and well laid-out. I was impressed by the dissemination campaign and the adept use of social media. The consent can be linked to user preferences with flashcards."

    Find out more

     

    Long-term conditions award first prize

    Live your life – living with and beyond lymphoma
    Lymphoma Action, November 2018

    Long-Term Conditions Award First Prize 

    There are over 60 types of lymphoma and around 19,500 people have a diagnosis each year in the UK. Studies show that people often struggle emotionally being on active monitoring (‘watch and wait’) or once their treatment is completed. While it is often anticipated that the end of treatment will bring a sense of relief and happiness, in reality many people find this is an exceptionally difficult time – they have lost faith in their body, and they may have had to cope with major life changes, such as time out of work and changes to their relationships. As well as the emotional impact of having had a cancer diagnosis, there are also physical and practical implications, such as the impact on career, finances, and perhaps adapted to a modified lifestyle through diet and exercise.

    Live your Life is a series of one-day workshops developed by Lymphoma Action. They are for people who have finished treatment or are on ‘watch and wait’. The resource covers what lymphoma is, how to cope with it, what to look out for in case your lymphoma returns, dealing with the emotional aspects of living with lymphoma,and practical topics such as diet and exercise.They are held in a relaxed, informal setting where people have the chance to meet others affected by lymphoma and to share their experiences in a safe and confidential environment.Feedback showed that many participants thought a companion workbook would be useful so that tips, ideas and explainers could be summarised. The workbook would summarise the key points of the topics covered in the workshop, allow space for participants to record their own experiences and thoughts, provide practical tips and signpost to further information.

    It was reviewed by freelance writer and editor in health, wellbeing and life sciences Louise Coghlin who commented:

    "The resource seems excellent to me. The topics covered, the amount of information given, and the way the information is presented, encouraging interactive use by the audience, seem perfect.There is enough information to enable use of the workbook to make a real and substantial difference to people’s lives. The most important things are not swamped or hidden by detail. The flow of information, and pace of information delivery,seem very good. Information is broken down well into manageable, actionable chunks. Design features such as headings, layout, page breaks and colour coding all make it easy to find your way around. The language is clear. The tone is friendly and supportive, with an air of reliability. Pictures enhance the messages in the text and add to the overall feeling of positivity and empowerment.A wide range of issues are covered in a caring,thoughtful and constructive way. The workbook guides people through the process of thinking about their own situation, how they are feeling,what matters most to them, and how they can improve their own quality of life, suggesting things they can do to achieve that and ways to get more information and more help. This thoughtful,practical approach to helping people to help themselves is a major strength of the workbook.It should enable the workbook to make a real difference to people’s lives."

    Find out more

     

    Long-term conditions award runner up

    Multiple Sclerosis Trust website
    MS Trust, August 2018

    Long-Term Conditions Award Runner Up

    The new website is intended for people with MS, their families and friends to be able to find information about all aspects of MS (multiple sclerosis). It includes everything from an A-Z of MS through to core information on what MS is and how it is treated and managed in the UK. Website users can find information on diet, exercise and family relationships in the context of living well with MS.There are separate areas for health professionals as well as support and inspiration for fundraisers.

    New features of the website include: improved navigation and clearer signposting to information using a condensed menu, intuitive linkages between pages and no sidebars; improved search functions so that research, news and core information are easier to find; improved visual appeal, including relevant photos and videos, for those who prefer visual learning to text based information; improved options for feedback from users.

    It was reviewed by information design consultant at JETDoc Jane E Teather who commented:

    "I loved this website, and spent a long time exploring it, learning quite a lot on the way. Visually, it looks great; the structure has been very well-thought out,with multiple links so that users can take different routes to the information they want. The content is very well-written, with just the right tone. The contributions from patients and professionals add a huge amount to the value of the site. This is a fantastic resource that has had a lot of thought and effort put into it. I strongly commend it."

    Find out more

     

    Screening award first prize

    Cervical screening after sexual violence
    Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust, August 2018

    Screening Award First Prize

    Since the age of 16, one in five women in England and Wales have experienced some kind of sexual violence. One in five women in Scotland have had someone try to force them to have sex against their will. We define sexual violence as any unwanted sexual act or activity, including rape, assault and sustained sexual abuse. The impacts of sexual violence are wide-ranging – affecting our emotional and physical selves – and can last a lifetime.

    Invasive tests like cervical screening, where you are in a particularly vulnerable position, can be difficult. We created this resource to provide survivors of sexual violence with emotional and practical support before, during and after cervical screening (a smear test), if they choose to have the test. Our secondary aim was to equip healthcare professionals with the means to support survivors of sexual violence before, during or after cervical screening. Without this resource, there is very little available to survivors and healthcare professionals on the topic of cervical screening. While specialist clinics exist to support survivors to have the test, there is nothing to support them in making the decision to have it – to help survivors properly prepare, understand what happens and how they may be able to manage flashbacks or other reactions, and know their rights when it comes to support from the nurse.

    Every survivor’s experience, and how that has impacted their life, is different, but we are confident this resource addresses common concerns, equips survivors to make a decision about cervical screening, and offers some ways of coping with the test.

    It was reviewed by Manchester education fellow in emergency medicine Aideen Carroll who commented:

    "This is an extremely well-thought out and collaborative resource from a respected cervical screening organisation. I liked the extent of user input and signposting to further organisations. Editing and production of the web page is faultless."

    Find out more

     

    Screening award runner up

    Their story, your choice
    Terrence Higgins Trust, February 2018

    Their Story, Your Choice is a pioneering new way of using interactive film to tackle HIV stigma in black African communities who are disproportionately affected by HIV. By inviting the viewer to participate and make choices for the characters, Their Story,Your Choice challenges assumptions and attitudes around HIV. The films seeks to encourage behaviour change in relation to HIV testing and treatment in order to reduce undiagnosed HIV and late diagnosis and encourage HIV testing. The aim is to amplify the voices of those living with HIV and to promote healthy relationships. Three interactive films were made using actors to portray facts, characters,relationships and lived experiences of black African people living with HIV in the UK. The films use innovative digital technologies together with a popular tradition in black African communities,that of story-telling. HIV stigma is a major barrier to black African people testing for HIV and contributes to high rates of late diagnosis.

    Each story in the films has various possible outcomes depending on choices viewers make for the characters in the film. Themes cover: disclosure/talking about HIV in relationships, late diagnosis, dating, and abuse.The films have been designed to be watched online on mobile phone, tablet or computer. Each film has eight possible endings depending on the choices viewers make for the characters in the films. At the end of each story line, viewers are encouraged to go back to the beginning and try out different choices.The films were scripted in a compelling ‘soap opera’ style and geared to appeal to a wide range of audiences to enable stealth-like learning. The films are subtitled to support low literacy, English as a second language and silent viewing. Viewers are encouraged to share the films on social media, post questions to the charity in confidence, or take an HIV test.

    It was reviewed by Luto chief executive Wayne Middleton who commented:

    "I enjoyed reviewing this fantastic resource with great interactive style. I like the high-quality production of the videos. Well done to the team involved. This is an interesting resource which has been well-designed by THT and is a good example of user involvement. It is exceptional."

    Find out more

     

    Self-care award first prize

    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust
    Axial spondyloarthritis know-how (ASK) self-management toolkit  

    Self-Care Award First Prize

    Axial Spondyloarthritis Know-how (ASK) is a single attendance self-management workshop at Guy’s Hospital for those living with the long-term inflammatory arthritis condition called AS (axial spondyloarthritis). The overarching objective of the ASK self-management toolkit is to deliver a range of high quality, sustainable and person-centred educational resources which are flexible, offer choice and match the health behaviour preference of the individual based on the self-management principles of The problem with… and Any Questions? …Just ASK. As affects young adults in their most productive years, the flexible format for dissemination of the ASK self-management toolkit aims to provide the ‘one stop approach’ to the delivery of self-management education with the suite of ASK resources wrapped around the single attendance to the two hour group workshop. A link to the ASK self-management toolkit is sent as a SMS message to patients prior to attendance.

    A novel feature and important aspect of the ASK self-management programme is the provision of a range of both written and digital resources. As the journey to diagnosis and experience of living with AS varies greatly, the ASK self-management toolkit aims to offer a range of resources, in multimedia formats, suited to the needs of the individual. They are based on the self-management principle of problem-solving, health-behaviour change, shared decision-making and goal-setting. A link to the ASK self-management toolkit is sent as a SMS message to patients prior to attendance. The link is to the ASK webpage on Guy’s and St Thomas’ public website which hosts all the toolkit materials: a short educational ASK film to be viewed prior to attending the workshop; digital interactive PDF copy of the ASK self-management Handbook available prior to attendance; the ASK Self-Management Assessment Tool – an online assessment tool capturing exercise behaviour, attitudes to exercise, smoking status, self-efficacy and emotional well-being in a short digital questionnaire-style to be completed prior to attendance and at three, six and 12 months following attendance to maintain support.

    This was reviewed by Stafford GP, Peter Glennon, who commented:

    "I was very impressed by this substantial and comprehensive self-management toolkit for patients with AS. Although it is designed to be used in conjunction with attendance at a physio group session at Guy’s/St Thomas’ it deserves a much wider rollout potentially to all patients in the UK with the condition. The digital format should make this easily achievable. As well as providing copious and clear information about the condition, perhaps more importantly, it gives the reader a very practical set of resources for making and maintaining lifestyle changes. It could also provide lifelong support for the patient to record, reflect upon, and monitor their illness and empower their self-sufficiency. I feel the model could also be easily adaptable to other chronic rheumatic disorders. This is an ambitious and exciting toolkit."  

    Chair of the BMA PLG (patient liaison group) Lesley Bentley commented:

    "The Axial Spondyloarthritis Know-how (ASK) toolkit provides a really useful way for patients to feel supported in gaining a good understanding of their condition and how it may affect their way of life.  Being given an opportunity to exchange experiences and ideas with other patients at the outset is invaluable, as is the wide range of practical information provided by the toolkit on how to self-manage the condition."

    Contact Melanie Martin MSc MCSP, Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist Musculoskeletal Assessment for further details. Melanie’s email address is [email protected]

    Self-care award runner up

    Caring for someone with scleroderma
    Boehringer Ingelheim (sponsor) and Hamell Communications, April 2018

    Self-Care Award Runner Up

    This project was sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim and conducted by Hamell Communications. Boehringer Ingelheim, wanted to raise awareness and improve understanding of the rare disease SSc (systemic sclerosis) amongst patients and healthcare professionals to ensure prompt diagnosis and provision of accurate information to patients to help them better understand their complex condition. We therefore worked with healthcare professionals (doctors and specialist nurses), patients and their carers to develop materials that would help patients to identify patterns of symptoms and encourage them to seek help.

    Currently, a diagnosis of SSc may take many months or years which can negatively impact on the emotional and physical wellbeing of patients. It also delays receiving any form of treatment, increasing the risk that their disease will progress and that there will be irreversible damage to internal organs. We want to ensure that physicians who were not familiar with SSc were made aware of and could recognise potential symptoms, encouraging earlier specialist referral. We plan to provide patients already diagnosed with the condition with accurate information to help them easily understand their condition, treatment and management and giving them a sense of control.

    It was reviewed by pharmaceutical physician David Ingram who commented:

    "This is the best patient leaflet I have ever had the pleasure to see, to the extent that I had to ask my wife to look at it to see if she could find fault.The first 20 pages are concerned with general encouragement to carers and patients to work together as a team and demonstrating how this team effort improves quality of life. It aims to support and encourage both carers and patients with scleroderma who know the condition is untreatable and have yet to learn that many symptoms may be mitigated by changes in diet or by specific exercises."

    Find out more

     

    Trusts award first prize

    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

    Axial spondyloarthritis know-how (ASK) self-management toolkit  

    Self-Care Award First Prize

    Axial Spondyloarthritis Know-how (ASK) is a single attendance self-management workshop at Guy’s Hospital for those living with the long-term inflammatory arthritis condition called AS (axial spondyloarthritis). The overarching objective of the ASK self-management toolkit is to deliver a range of high quality, sustainable and person-centred educational resources which are flexible, offer choice and match the health behaviour preference of the individual based on the self-management principles of The problem with… and Any Questions? …Just ASK. As affects young adults in their most productive years, the flexible format for dissemination of the ASK self-management toolkit aims to provide the ‘one stop approach’ to the delivery of self-management education with the suite of ASK resources wrapped around the single attendance to the two hour group workshop. A link to the ASK self-management toolkit is sent as a SMS message to patients prior to attendance.

    A novel feature and important aspect of the ASK self-management programme is the provision of a range of both written and digital resources. As the journey to diagnosis and experience of living with AS varies greatly, the ASK self-management toolkit aims to offer a range of resources, in multimedia formats, suited to the needs of the individual. They are based on the self-management principle of problem-solving, health-behaviour change, shared decision-making and goal-setting. A link to the ASK self-management toolkit is sent as a SMS message to patients prior to attendance. The link is to the ASK webpage on Guy’s and St Thomas’ public website which hosts all the toolkit materials: a short educational ASK film to be viewed prior to attending the workshop; digital interactive PDF copy of the ASK self-management Handbook available prior to attendance; the ASK Self-Management Assessment Tool – an online assessment tool capturing exercise behaviour, attitudes to exercise, smoking status, self-efficacy and emotional well-being in a short digital questionnaire-style to be completed prior to attendance and at three, six and 12 months following attendance to maintain support.

    This was reviewed by Stafford GP Peter Glennon, who commented:

    "I was very impressed by this substantial and comprehensive self-management toolkit for patients with AS. Although it is designed to be used in conjunction with attendance at a physio group session at Guy’s/St Thomas’ it deserves a much wider rollout potentially to all patients in the UK with the condition. The digital format should make this easily achievable. As well as providing copious and clear information about the condition, perhaps more importantly, it gives the reader a very practical set of resources for making and maintaining lifestyle changes. It could also provide lifelong support for the patient to record, reflect upon, and monitor their illness and empower their self-sufficiency. I feel the model could also be easily adaptable to other chronic rheumatic disorders. This is an ambitious and exciting toolkit."

    Chair of the BMA PLG (patient liaison group) Lesley Bentley commented:

    "The Axial Spondyloarthritis Know-how (ASK) toolkit provides a really useful way for patients to feel supported in gaining a good understanding of their condition and how it may affect their way of life.  Being given an opportunity to exchange experiences and ideas with other patients at the outset is invaluable, as is the wide range of practical information provided by the toolkit on how to self-manage the condition."

    Contact Melanie Martin MSc MCSP, Clinical Specialist Physiotherapist Musculoskeletal Assessment for further details. Melanie’s email address is [email protected]

    Trusts award runner Up

    Sammy Bear’s mummy is in hospital: a story for children aged 3-6 to be read with an adult
    South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, March 2018

    Trusts Award Runner Up

    Dr Nicola Byrne (Consultant psychiatrist) and the team working at the Friends and Family Clinic on Nelson Ward, (female inpatient ward at Lambeth Hospital, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust) identified a need for information for children whose parent is admitted to a mental health ward. Many of the patients admitted to the ward are mothers. It was identified that those caring for children whose mothers were admitted had limited access to information to support them to have conversations with the children about why their mother had been admitted to hospital, and what to expect. The booklets include:Helping children to understand what is wrong with their parent, how they are being helped on the ward, and what will happen next. The leaflets are disseminated through professional groups who can then provide the age-appropriate leaflets to children and families with whom they work.

    It was reviewed by patient information specialist at Capita Nargis S Mandry who commented:

    "This is very good booklet – well-thought through, fantastic pictures aid understanding – mental health issues are explained in clear, simple way.It gives just the right amount of information and positive things a child can do for parents such as write get well card. I particularly like the way it explains mental illness – very simple and effective.This is for a young child – they can read it with an adult. I know young children like to go over booklets many times and this may be particularly helpful if a parent is in hospital."

    Find out more

     

    User engagement award first prize

    Breast Cancer Care app (BECCA)
    Breast Cancer Care, May 2017

    User Engagement Award First Prize

    In consultation with people who have faced the daunting experience of rebuilding their lives after breast cancer, we co-created a mobile app to support those confronting this challenging transition. Delivering reliable strategies, hints and tips to the user, BECCA (Breast Cancer Care app)aims to empower and equip people to adjust to life beyond breast cancer treatment. Following months of treatment, people expect finishing hospital treatment to be the end of breast cancer. However,many find themselves facing a difficult time as they try to adapt to an altered body image, feelings of isolation, former responsibilities, the fear of recurrence, and physical side effects including lymphoedema and menopausal symptoms. BECCA was launched to help people adapt and adjust to these symptoms and concerns with confidence.It provides information, support and inspiration in a simple and digestible way with easy-to-use flashcards. It includes personal stories, podcasts,videos and other trusted information and support pages. It is organised into 11 categories, from beauty and exercise to symptoms and concerns, to help users find the information and support they need with ease.

    It was reviewed by Richard Jones who commented:

    "This is an excellent app which has been carefully designed to meet user needs. It is easy to use and well laid out. I was impressed by the dissemination campaign and the adept use of social media. The consent can be linked to user preferences with flashcards."

    Find out more

     

    User engagement award runner up

    How do beta blockers work? How does aspirin work? How does warfarin work? How do ACE inhibitors work? How do novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) work?
    British Heart Foundation, October 2018

    User Engagement Award Runner Up

    The BHF understands that medication adherence can be a barrier to patients managing their own health. We wanted to help them understand more a bout their medication, in an engaging way. The objective of these five animations was to explain the process of how the medications work in order to make patients more aware their vital role and make them more likely to take their medication. If people don’t understand what their medication does, they are less likely to take it, which could have serious consequences. People taking warfarin, an anticoagulant medication, may experience side effects. If they are unaware of the importance of taking this medication, these side effects may outweigh the benefits of taking the medication in a patient’s mind, leading to them stopping medication.Knowing this, we chose five priority medications which are frequently used in the treatment of heart and circulatory conditions. By creating engaging,eye-catching multimedia context, we could help people to learn more about their medication and understand the importance of taking it.

    It was reviewed by Richard Jones who commented:

    "This suite of animations has a clear objective to improve adherence by explaining how these drugs work. Animations were sent to 38 patients from the patient panel at all three key stages; scripts,visuals and storyboards, and draft animation stage. I was impressed that they have documented specific changes which were made as well as general supportive feedback. The purpose is clear:to explain the process of how the medications work in order to make patients more aware of the importance of the vital role medicine takes in managing their condition, and as a result to make them more likely to take their medication. The animations are brief and captivating to watch They supplement the textual information on the BHF website and have high production standards. The feedback which has been provided is supportive and positive. I can see that they will be very useful."

    Find out more

     

    Well-being award first prize

    distrACT app
    Expert Self Care Ltd, October 2017

    Well-being Award First Prize

    The free distrACT app gives people who self-harm and may feel suicidal quick, easy and discreet access to information and advice, so they can manage difficult feelings, cope with a crisis and find help and support.

    Expert Self Care Ltd is certified by the NHS England Information Standard as a producer or reliable and accurate health information, which means that we involve experts and users in the development of all our information products. The idea for this app came from two health professionals with experience of working with people who self-harm and may feel suicidal.We involved national experts and researchers in the field of self-harm and suicide prevention in the development of the app. Users and patients were an integral part of the project and advisory team and were involved and consulted throughout the duration of the project and app development. They gave input on app design and content creation. In addition, we sought feedback from users through representatives of patient and user support groups.

    It was reviewed by specialty doctor in psychiatry Jason Holdcroft-Long who commented:

    "This is a very well-researched and put together application for people at risk of self harm and suicide, which offers a lot of information and support in a simple and effective format. The information, for instance in the section on physical self-harm, is written with a neutral and non-judgemental tone and is structured around questions the user may be asking. A wide range of health professionals has been involved in the development of this app, from academics in epidemiology to front-line clinicians. These include clinical professionals with expertise in information technology in healthcare, and individuals working directly with people who self-harm. The involvement of experts and professionals in the development of this app is outstanding."

    Find out more

     

    Well-being award runner up

    Infopack for living well with myeloma
    Myeloma UK, January 2018

    Well-being Award Runner Up

    Myeloma is a rare and complex cancer arising from plasma cells within the bone marrow. Myeloma is treatable but not curable and the relapsing-remitting nature of it brings a unique set of challenges in comparison to other curable cancers, in particular. It is a unique and individual cancer and can affect all areas of life, sometimes in unexpected ways. This info pack has been written for all myeloma patients to help them live well after receiving a myeloma diagnosis. It is also helpful for carers, family members and friends. This info pack aims to support patients and their families through the challenges that this diagnosis can bring and the many ways in which it will affect how they live their lives. It aims to empower patients and help them to consider challenges that they may not have been aware of. It includes a wide range of issues, from physical and financial changes to emotional and psychological issues. It also encourages patients to take control of what they can and seek support for the things they can’t. It will benefit patients if they look ahead and get support for the challenges they may face.As this info pack covers a wide variety of topics, it has been produced with sections with easy to use tabs.

    It was reviewed by haematology consultant Joel Newman who commented:

    "This is an excellent resource. Well-researched and covering all the relevant topics in how to live your life well, when living with myeloma. It is readable,well-indexed, comprehensive, and well-presented in a spiral bound format. Highly recommended."

    Find out more

     

    Young adults award first prize

    Helping your child to eat well during cancer treatment: A practical information guide for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer
    Children’s Cancer and Leukaemia Group (CCLG), October 2018

    Young Adults Award First Prize

    Most children with cancer will experience problems with eating and drinking at some stage. But eating well during treatment is really important as a well-nourished child is able to cope better with their treatment and fight infection. It also helps their body to repair healthy body tissues damaged by chemotherapy or radiotherapy. This booklet is a practical information guide for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer.There is an introductory section on different food groups and their role in how they help the body to function properly. The booklet addresses this issue with advice on the types of food to give the child and the importance of increasing physical activity. A useful anti-cancer diet myth buster is also included to address concerns raised by parents after reading about specific diets or supplements that claim to cure cancer. Information sources are signposted to at the end of the booklet and parents are encouraged to talk to their child’s medical team and dietitian for more specific advice. This definitive guide is widely used within the children’s cancer centres by paediatric oncology teams.

    It was reviewed by academic clinical fellow ST3 Melody Redman who commented:

    "I think this is a high quality document, produced by experts in the field. It is very clear and helpful,with many suitable subheadings and areas for reading. The information is nicely laid out with a clear contents page. The subheadings are all very clear. The use of pictures and the font are very appropriate. The booklet is handy and well-produced. Additionally, it has also been disseminated on social media."

    Find out more

     

    Young adults award runner up

    Leaving home and eating well with cystic fibrosis
    Cystic Fibrosis Trust, February 2018

    Young Adults Award Runner Up

    Leaving home and eating well with cystic fibrosis is part of a series of leaflets on nutrition in CF (cystic fibrosis). This leaflet is aimed at young people who are leaving their family home and will be looking after their nutritional needs for themselves for the first time. For people with CF, maintaining a healthy weight has a direct impact on lung health and aids the ability to fight off infections. People with the condition will require a diet high in energy to maintain a healthy weight. In addition to this,most are pancreatic insufficient, meaning they will need to take pancreatic enzyme supplements with their food and drinks. Without these enzyme supplements the body can become malnourished and it can affect growth and weight. When people live in their family home, they may have the support of their family. Once they leave home, they maybe managing all of this on their own. Young people can feel the information is reliable as it is written by CF dietitians. Parents can see it has a lot of advice and practical tips which will help a young person to become more independent while being supported.

    It was reviewed by Blackburn GP Helen Miles who commented:

    "This is a very clear leaflet. I was impressed with the tone and level of the language which I feel is accessible across a range of ages and abilities.The printed leaflet reads well for those with specific learning disability or visual problems with infrequent bolding, off-white background and no underlining of text. The titles are informative and serve as key point summaries. The tips themselves are impressive as they cover a huge amount and are very practical based around life choices with other suggestions given, should the ideal not happen. I am impressed with the involvement of patients and parents at early stages of development. It is very clear the information in the leaflet is based on this. There is a clear dissemination strategy."

    Find out more

     

    BMA patient information reviewer of year award

    Jane Teather

    Jane Teather is a geneticist and information design consultant specialising in information about medicines and healthcare. She established JETDoc (https://www.jetdoc.co.uk/) in 1991, which since the early 2000s has specialised in information about medicines and healthcare.

    She is one of the inaugural life fellows of the Communications Research Institute (CRI) and a fellow and former council member of the Institute of Scientific and Technical Communicators (ISTC).  She is also a member of Patient Information Forum and has been a reviewer for the BMA Patient Information Awards since 2009.

  • Highly commended resources and commended resources

    Highly commended resources

    Title Internet resources

    A long life with HIV
    NAM aidsmap

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    Alcohol after brain injury: tips for families, friends and carers
    Headway - the brain injury association

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    Alcohol after brain injury
    Headway - the brain injury association

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    Anna loses her hair: A children's guide to hair loss as a result of cancer treatment
    Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group (CCLG)

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    ASone
    National Ankylosing Spondylitis Society (NASS)

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    Axial spondyloarthritis know-how (ASK) self-management toolkit
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

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    Bereavement and stem cell transplant
    Anthony Nolan

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    Bereavement, loss and dementia: supporting people with dementia and those close to them through the grieving process
    Cruse Bereavement Care Cymru

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    Breast Cancer Care App (BECCA)
    Breast Cancer Care

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    Breast pain
    Breast Cancer Care

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    Can’t pass it on campaign
    Terrence Higgins Trust

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    Care companion
    Global Initiative

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    Motor Neurone Disease Association

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    Boehringer Ingelheim (sponsor) and Hamell Communications

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    Cervical screening after sexual violence
    Jo's Cervical Cancer Trust

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    Children's Social Services and Safeguarding
    The Royal College of Psychiatrists

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    Children Coming to Hospital
    Edge Hill University

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    Macmillan Cancer Support

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    Clinical trials for lymphoma
    Lymphoma Action

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    The Children's Trust

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    DadPad neonatal
    Dr Minesh Khashu & Inspire Cornwall CIC

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    MS Trust

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    Expert Self Care Ltd

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    The Ectopic Pregnancy Trust

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    Diabetes UK

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    Fast Facts: Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency for patients and supporters
    Dr Rachael Grace and S. Karger Publishers Limited

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    Finding out you have lymphoma - Easy Read version
    Lymphoma Action

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    Motor Neurone Disease Association

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    Fitter better sooner – a patient information toolkit on preparing for surgery
    Royal College of Anaesthetists

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    Help with care needs
    Marie Curie

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    Helping your child to eat well during cancer treatment: A practical information guide for parents and families of a child or young person with cancer
    Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group (CCLG)

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    How do beta blockers work? How does aspirin work? How does warfarin work? How do ACE inhibitors work? How do novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) work?
    British Heart Foundation

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    HSC Hospital Passport
    Public Health Agency

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    Infopack for living well with myeloma
    Myeloma UK

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    Jack has RAS
    STARS (Syncope Trust And Reflex anoxic Seizures)

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    Leaving home and eating well with cystic fibrosis
    Cystic Fibrosis Trust

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    Life's questions
    St Nicholas Hospice Care

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    Live your life – living with and beyond lymphoma
    Lymphoma Action

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    Living well with long-term health conditions
    Independent Age

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    Living with lung cancer
    Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

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    Looking after your child who has SMA
    Spinal Muscular Atrophy UK

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    Managing lung problems in scleroderma
    Boehringer Ingelheim (sponsor) and Hamell Communications

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    Meningitis and childhood deafness: a guide for families
    National Deaf Children's Society

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    Moving forward
    Breast Cancer Care

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    MS TV: a YouTube channel for young people affected by multiple sclerosis (Video)
    MS Trust

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    Multiple Sclerosis Trust website
    MS Trust

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    My diabetes my way eLearning resources
    My Way Digital Health

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    My diabetes year
    Diabetes UK
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    My Parent is in hospital: information for older children and teenagers with a parent in a mental health ward
    South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

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    Myeloma
    Bloodwise

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    Osteoarthritis
    Versus Arthritis

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    Peanut allergy and tree nut allergy – the facts
    The Anaphylaxis Campaign

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    Periarticular knee osteotomy
    Salford Royal Foundation Trust

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    Perinatal OCD
    The Royal College of Psychiatrists

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    Planning ahead: my treatment and care
    Compassion in Dying

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    Preparing for hospital isolation booklet
    Anthony Nolan

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    Radiotherapy for lung cancer
    Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation

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    Rheumatology Connect App
    Health and Care Videos and Torbay and South Devon NHS Foundation Trust 

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    Sammy Bear's mummy is in hospital: a story for children aged 3-6 to be read with an adult
    South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

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    Some mums & dads drink too much
    Nacoa
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    Starting secondary school comic
    Cystic Fibrosis Trust

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    Stay active, stay well (online and a DVD)
    British Lung Foundation

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    The Children's Trust Brain Injury Community Service Animation and Leaflet
    The Children's Trust

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    The Itchy-saurus
    Dr Rosie Wellesley and Pavilion Books Ltd

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    Their story, your choice
    Terrence Higgins Trust

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    Thinking ahead: planning for your future with advanced liver disease
    British Liver Trust

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    Tidings
    lostomy UK

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    Treatment add-ons
    Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA)

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    UK Paruresis Trust website
    The UK Paruresis Trust

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    Understanding risk factors series (Understanding physical activity, Understanding smoking,  Understanding stress, Understanding blood pressure, Understanding cholesterol, Understanding Type 2 diabetes, Understanding your weight)
    British Heart Foundation

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    Understanding what influences your mental health and wellbeing
    Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

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    Using a syringe driver animation
    Marie Curie

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    Which? later life care
    Which?
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    Workplace Mental Health
    Bupa UK
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    Young people who self-harm: a guide for school staff
    Centre for Suicide Research
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    Younger people with bowel cancer – a guide for the under 50s
    Bowel Cancer UK
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    Your cancer treatment record
    Cancer Research UK and UK Chemotherapy board
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    Commended resources

    Title Internet resources

    A series of films about chronic kidney disease
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust

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    Active fun for everyone: improving activity in children and young people with physical disabilities
    Public Health Agency

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    Adrenaline Factsheet
    The Anaphylaxis Campaign

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    AIR: RRP patient website
    The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

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    Alcohol and you – a self-help guide
    Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

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    All about inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) – foldout
    CICRA: better lives for children with crohns and colitis

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    Be in the know
    Diabetes UK

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    Brain injury: a guide for parents
    Headway - the brain injury association

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    Can't go in toilets when others are around?
    The UK Paruresis Trust

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    Cancer treatments and sepsis
    Macmillan Cancer Support

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    Could you change the future of cystic fibrosis?
    Cystic Fibrosis Trust

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    Employment Resources
    The Brain Tumour Charity

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    Explaining the NICE guidelines for diagnosing and managing pancreatic cancer
    Pancreatic Cancer UK

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    Finding high-quality health information: for patients and the public
    NELFT NHS

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    Freezing in Parkinson's
    Parkinson's UK

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    Health and Care Videos and Northern Devon Healthcare NHS 
    Health and Care Videos

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    Liver disease: a guide for young people
    Children's Liver Disease Foundation

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    Living well with ovarian cancer mini guides
    Target Ovarian Cancer

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    Living with Addisons disease – a guide for people with Addisons, supporters and professionals
    Addison’s Disease Self-Help Group (ADSHG)

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    Managing your bladder: A guide for people with MS
    MS Trust

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    MS and your eyes (large print version)
    MS Society

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    My health my life: a symptom tracker and appointment planner for young people with IBD
    CICRA: better lives for children with crohns and colitis

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    My transplant tracker: patient App
    Anthony Nolan

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    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) film
    Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust / Evelina London Children’s Hospital

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    Our treatment stories videos
    MS Society

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    Pain and unpleasant sensations in MS
    MS Society

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    Pancreatic cancer and end of life care: information for people in the last few months, weeks or days of life
    Pancreatic Cancer UK

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    Physiotherapy advice multi-level spinal instrumentation
    Salford Royal Foundation Trust

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    Planning for the final stages of a long-term lung condition
    British Lung Foundation

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    Postpartum psychosis for carers
    The Royal College of Psychiatrists

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    Preparing for heart surgery
    British Heart Foundation
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    Recognising palliative care emergencies
    Marie Curie

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    Rheumatoid arthritis
    Versus Arthritis

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    Sex and MS (A guide for WOMEN & Sex and MS: A guide for MEN)
    MS Trust
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    Singing for lung health hub
    British Lung Foundation
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    Sleep tips and techniques for families who have a child with a brain condition
    Cerebra and the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of Birmingham
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    So you have back pain?
    Impact Accelerator Unit, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Keele University
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    Supporting someone with IBD: a guide for friends and family
    Crohn's & Colitis UK
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    Talking therapy and counselling
    Mind
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    Teenage and young adults: Going home after transplant
    The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust
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    Testing yourself for HIV needn’t be a chore campaign
    Terrence Higgins Trust
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    The man manual: men's health made easy
    Men's Health Forum
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    Treatment guide series
    Myeloma UK
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    Understanding infection (fact sheet)
    Bloodwise
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    Understanding mental health problems
    Mind
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    Understanding scleroderma
    Boehringer Ingelheim (sponsor) and Hamell Communications acting
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    What’s my cancer risk?
    Cancer Research UK
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    What causes breast cancer?
    Breast Cancer Now
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    What is blood cancer? (animation)
    Bloodwise
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    When your baby dies: a particular kind of grief
    Child Bereavement UK
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    Woman's Own magazine
    Cancer Research UK
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    Your axial spondyloarthritis (AS) journey
    National Ankylosing Spondylitis Society (NASS)
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    #BeAChildCancerFriend – for friends of parents of a child with cancer
    Children's Cancer and Leukaemia Group (CCLG)
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