Scotland

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People need the chance to give the gift of life

The gift of someone’s organs, after their death, is so valuable that I can’t overstate it.

I’m a kidney specialist working in a small unit in Dumfries, looking after around 55 patients on dialysis and hundreds more in the clinic or in intensive care.

Many of my patients are very ill, and some die waiting for a transplant. They literally put their lives on hold until they get that call, that precious gift of life.

We don't want people who might have wished to donate their organs to die without being given that chance to save lives  

Dr Sue Robertson

Trying to discuss organ donation with a potential donor for the first time when they have just suffered a terrible accident or are about to die is almost impossible. It’s a hugely distressing time for the family, no matter what age that person is.

We don't want people who might have wished to donate their organs to die without being given that chance to save others' lives.

In my experience, it’s a huge comfort to people’s families to know that their loved one has given the gift of life to someone else.

The opt-out system allows you to register your objection if you don’t wish to donate and, in the event of your death, your family would not be approached.

It’s not just kidneys that people are waiting for in Scotland, it’s also lungs and hearts, and we don’t have a way to keep those people alive while they wait.

So please talk to your family about organ donation while you’re well, when you can have a full and frank discussion, and do what you can to support our campaign to introduce an opt-out system to Scotland.